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Summary Report for:
35-2015.00 - Cooks, Short Order

Prepare and cook to order a variety of foods that require only a short preparation time. May take orders from customers and serve patrons at counters or tables.

Sample of reported job titles: Caterer, Cook, Deli Cook (Delicatessen Cook), Grill Cook, Line Cook, Pizza Maker, Prep Cook (Preparation Cook), Short Order Cook, Snack Bar Cook

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Tasks  |  Technology Skills  |  Tools Used  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Detailed Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Grill, cook, and fry foods such as french fries, eggs, and pancakes.
  • Clean food preparation equipment, work areas, and counters or tables.
  • Take orders from customers and cook foods requiring short preparation times, according to customer requirements.
  • Grill and garnish hamburgers or other meats, such as steaks and chops.
  • Restock kitchen supplies, rotate food, and stamp the time and date on food in coolers.
  • Perform food preparation tasks, such as making sandwiches, carving meats, making soups or salads, baking breads or desserts, and brewing coffee or tea.
  • Plan work on orders so that items served together are finished at the same time.
  • Complete orders from steam tables, placing food on plates and serving customers at tables or counters.
  • Perform general cleaning activities in kitchen and dining areas.
  • Accept payments, and make change or write charge slips as necessary.
  • Order supplies and stock them on shelves.

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Technology Skills

  • Inventory management software — Inventory control software
  • Point of sale POS software — Aldelo Systems Aldelo for Restaurants Pro; Foodman Home-Delivery; Plexis Software Plexis POS; RestaurantPlus PRO

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Tools Used

  • Bar code reader equipment — Hand scanners
  • Cappuccino or espresso machines — Cappuccino makers
  • Carbonated beverage dispenser — Carbonated beverage dispensers
  • Cash registers
  • Commercial use blenders — Blenders
  • Commercial use broilers — Broilers
  • Commercial use coffee or iced tea makers — Commercial coffeemakers
  • Commercial use convection ovens — Convection ovens
  • Commercial use cutlery — Boning knives; Chefs' knives; Paring knives; Serrated blade knives
  • Commercial use deep fryers — Deep fat fryers
  • Commercial use dishwashers — Commercial dishwashers
  • Commercial use food processors — Food processors
  • Commercial use food slicers — Meat slicers; Slicing machines
  • Commercial use food warmers — Steam tables
  • Commercial use graters — Fruit zesters; Graters
  • Commercial use grills — Grills
  • Commercial use hot dog grills — Hot dog cookers
  • Commercial use measuring cups — Dry or liquid measuring cups
  • Commercial use microwave ovens — Commercial microwave ovens
  • Commercial use mixers — Mixers
  • Commercial use peelers — Vegetable peelers
  • Commercial use pizza ovens — Pizza ovens
  • Commercial use ranges — Electric ovens; Electric stoves; Gas ovens; Gas stoves
  • Commercial use rolling pins — Rolling pins
  • Commercial use scales — Portion scales
  • Commercial use steamers — Steam kettles; Steamers
  • Commercial use toasters — Toasters
  • Commercial use waffle irons — Waffle makers
  • Desktop computers
  • Domestic apple corer — Apple corers
  • Domestic double boilers — Double boilers
  • Domestic kitchen or food thermometers — Instant-read pocket thermometers
  • Domestic kitchen tongs — Kitchen tongs
  • Domestic knife sharpeners — Knife sharpeners
  • Domestic melon or butter baller — Melon ballers
  • Domestic sifter — Sifters
  • Domestic strainers or colanders — Colanders; Strainers
  • Domestic vegetable brush — Vegetable brushes
  • Domestic wooden oven paddle — Bakers' peels
  • Ice dispensers — Ice-making machines
  • Milkshake machines — Milkshake and smoothie machines
  • Non carbonated beverage dispenser — Juice dispensers
  • Personal computers
  • Pocket calculator — Handheld calculators
  • Point of sale POS terminal — Point of sale POS computer terminals
  • Soft serve machines — Soft-serve ice cream machines
  • Touch screen monitors

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Knowledge

  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Production and Processing — Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Food Production — Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
  • Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

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Skills

  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Time Management — Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Abilities

  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Time Sharing — The ability to shift back and forth between two or more activities or sources of information (such as speech, sounds, touch, or other sources).
  • Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Selective Attention — The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.

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Work Activities

  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others — Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.
  • Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People — Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings — Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public — Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
  • Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
  • Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information — Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.
  • Training and Teaching Others — Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

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Detailed Work Activities

  • Cook foods.
  • Clean food preparation areas, facilities, or equipment.
  • Take customer orders.
  • Store supplies or goods in kitchens or storage areas.
  • Maintain food, beverage, or equipment inventories.
  • Coordinate timing of food production activities.
  • Prepare breads or doughs.
  • Prepare foods for cooking or serving.
  • Prepare hot or cold beverages.
  • Arrange food for serving.
  • Serve food or beverages.
  • Process customer bills or payments.
  • Order materials, supplies, or equipment.

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Work Context

  • Spend Time Standing — 99% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 88% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 84% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 70% responded “Every day.”
  • Time Pressure — 73% responded “Every day.”
  • Contact With Others — 65% responded “Constant contact with others.”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 63% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Exposed to Minor Burns, Cuts, Bites, or Stings — 69% responded “Every day.”
  • Physical Proximity — 49% responded “Very close (near touching).”
  • Very Hot or Cold Temperatures — 65% responded “Every day.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 62% responded “Very important results.”
  • Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — 65% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 11% responded “Very important.”
  • Responsible for Others' Health and Safety — 41% responded “Very high responsibility.”
  • Importance of Repeating Same Tasks — 46% responded “Very important.”
  • Spend Time Walking and Running — 37% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Coordinate or Lead Others — 38% responded “Very important.”
  • Indoors, Environmentally Controlled
  • Spend Time Bending or Twisting the Body — 22% responded “Less than half the time.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions — 24% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Deal With Unpleasant or Angry People — 48% responded “Once a week or more but not every day.”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work — 34% responded “Limited freedom.”
  • Consequence of Error — 24% responded “Fairly serious.”
  • Frequency of Decision Making — 24% responded “Once a year or more but not every month.”
  • Responsibility for Outcomes and Results — 13% responded “High responsibility.”
  • Exposed to Contaminants — 35% responded “Never.”
  • Deal With External Customers — 30% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Level of Competition — 26% responded “Not at all competitive.”
  • Pace Determined by Speed of Equipment — 37% responded “Not important at all.”
  • Letters and Memos — 28% responded “Never.”
  • Telephone — 31% responded “Every day.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone One: Little or No Preparation Needed
Education Some of these occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate.
Related Experience Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.
Job Zone Examples These occupations involve following instructions and helping others. Examples include counter and rental clerks, dishwashers, cashiers, landscaping and groundskeeping workers, logging equipment operators, and baristas.
SVP Range (Below 4.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
46   High school diploma or equivalent Help
34   Less than high school diploma
9   Associate's degree

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Credentials

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Interests

Interest code: RC

  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

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Work Styles

  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Social Orientation — Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
  • Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Leadership — Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
  • Innovation — Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.

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Work Values

  • Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
  • Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
  • Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2016) $10.52 hourly, $21,890 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2014) 182,000 employees
Projected growth (2014-2024) Decline (-2% or lower) Decline (-2% or lower)
Projected job openings (2014-2024) 48,000
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2014)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2016 wage data external site and 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

  • Cooks external site. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition.

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