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Summary Report for:
39-5094.00 - Skincare Specialists

Provide skincare treatments to face and body to enhance an individual's appearance. Includes electrologists and laser hair removal specialists.

Sample of reported job titles: Aesthetician, Clinical Esthetician, Esthetician, Facialist, Lead Esthetician, Medical Esthetician, Skin Care Specialist, Skin Care Technician, Skin Care Therapist, Spa Technician

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Tasks  |  Technology Skills  |  Tools Used  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Detailed Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Sterilize equipment and clean work areas.
  • Examine clients' skin, using magnifying lamps or visors when necessary, to evaluate skin condition and appearance.
  • Cleanse clients' skin with water, creams, or lotions.
  • Demonstrate how to clean and care for skin properly and recommend skin-care regimens.
  • Select and apply cosmetic products, such as creams, lotions, and tonics.
  • Perform simple extractions to remove blackheads.
  • Stay abreast of latest industry trends, products, research, and treatments.
  • Determine which products or colors will improve clients' skin quality and appearance.
  • Treat the facial skin to maintain and improve its appearance, using specialized techniques and products, such as peels and masks.
  • Refer clients to medical personnel for treatment of serious skin problems.
  • Remove body and facial hair by applying wax.
  • Provide facial and body massages.
  • Keep records of client needs and preferences and the services provided.
  • Apply chemical peels to reduce fine lines and age spots.
  • Advise clients about colors and types of makeup and instruct them in makeup application techniques.
  • Collaborate with plastic surgeons and dermatologists to provide patients with preoperative and postoperative skin care.
  • Sell makeup to clients.

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Technology Skills

  • Data base user interface and query software — Spa management software
  • Internet browser software — Web browser software
  • Office suite software — Microsoft Office
  • Presentation software — Microsoft PowerPoint Hot technology
  • Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel Hot technology
  • Word processing software — Microsoft Word

Hot technology Hot Technology — a technology requirement frequently included in employer job postings.

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Tools Used

  • Air brushes — Airbrushing tools
  • Blackhead remover — Spoon extractors
  • Blanket or solution warmer cabinets — Wax heaters
  • Cryosurgery equipment or accessories — Cryoprobes
  • Dermatoscopes
  • Dry heat or hot air sterilizers — Dry heat sterilizers
  • Galvanic or faradic stimulators — Galvanic facial machines
  • Hair scissors — Facial hair scissors
  • High frequency electromagnetic wave stimulator — High frequency skin care machines
  • Lancets — Skin lancets
  • Lasers — Skincare lasers
  • Magnifiers — Skin magnification systems
  • Moist steam cabinet — Facial steamers
  • Notebook computers — Laptop computers
  • Personal computers
  • Physical therapy massage table — Therapeutic massage tables
  • Steam autoclaves or sterilizers — Steam autoclaves
  • Surgical dermatomes or dermabraders or dermameshers or accessories — Microdermabrasion machines
  • Tablet computers
  • Tweezers — Hair removal tweezers
  • Ultrasonic therapy apparatus or supplies — Ultrasonic facial machines
  • Ultraviolet sterilizer — Ultraviolet UV sterilizers
  • Visible light radiator — Light-emitting diode LED light therapy equipment
  • Warming cabinets — Hot towel cabinets

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Knowledge

  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

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Skills

  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

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Abilities

  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Originality — The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem.
  • Selective Attention — The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.
  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.

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Work Activities

  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public — Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
  • Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  • Selling or Influencing Others — Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.
  • Thinking Creatively — Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge — Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Provide Consultation and Advice to Others — Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.

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Detailed Work Activities

  • Clean tools or equipment.
  • Clean work areas or facilities.
  • Apply cleansing or conditioning agents to client hair, scalp, or skin.
  • Assess skin or hair conditions.
  • Provide medical or cosmetic advice for clients.
  • Demonstrate activity techniques or equipment use.
  • Teach health or hygiene practices.
  • Maintain professional knowledge or certifications.
  • Administer therapeutic massages.
  • Maintain client information or service records.
  • Sell products or services.
  • Apply solutions to hair for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes.

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Work Context

  • Physical Proximity — 97% responded “Very close (near touching).”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 72% responded “Every day.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions
  • Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — 89% responded “Every day.”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 55% responded “Very important.”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 56% responded “More than half the time.”
  • Contact With Others — 74% responded “Constant contact with others.”
  • Level of Competition — 35% responded “Extremely competitive.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 41% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 43% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Deal With External Customers — 60% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Importance of Repeating Same Tasks — 13% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — 59% responded “Every day.”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work — 55% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Frequency of Decision Making — 38% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Standing — 57% responded “About half the time.”
  • Telephone — 30% responded “Once a week or more but not every day.”
  • Spend Time Sitting — 29% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 49% responded “Minor results.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Three: Medium Preparation Needed
Education Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
Related Experience Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.
Job Training Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations usually involve using communication and organizational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include food service managers, travel guides, electricians, agricultural technicians, barbers, nannies, and medical assistants.
SVP Range (6.0 to < 7.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
87   Post-secondary certificate Help
10   Some college, no degree
2   Associate's degree

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Credentials

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Interests

Interest code: ESR

  • Enterprising — Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Social — Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

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Work Styles

  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Social Orientation — Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Innovation — Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Leadership — Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.

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Work Values

  • Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
  • Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
  • Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2015) $14.47 hourly, $30,090 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2014) 55,000 employees
Projected growth (2014-2024) Faster than average (9% to 13%) Faster than average (9% to 13%)
Projected job openings (2014-2024) 10,900
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2014)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2015 wage data external site and 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

  • Skincare specialists external site. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition.

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