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Summary Report for:
43-5081.04 - Order Fillers, Wholesale and Retail Sales

Fill customers' mail and telephone orders from stored merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips or order forms. Duties include computing prices of items, completing order receipts, keeping records of out-going orders, and requisitioning additional materials, supplies, and equipment.

Sample of reported job titles: Customer Service Representative, Order Filler, Order Picker, Packer, Fulfillment Representative, Sales Representative, Personal Service Manager

View report: Summary  Details  Custom

Tasks  |  Tools & Technology  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Read orders to ascertain catalog numbers, sizes, colors, and quantities of merchandise.
  • Obtain merchandise from bins or shelves.
  • Compute prices of items or groups of items.
  • Complete order receipts.
  • Keep records of out-going orders.
  • Place merchandise on conveyors leading to wrapping areas.
  • Requisition additional materials, supplies, and equipment.

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Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

Bar code reader equipment — Barcode scanners
Forklifts — Stand-up forklifts; Warehouse forklifts
Pallet trucks — Electric pallet jacks; Manual pallet jacks; Pallet tipper
Postal scales — Shipping scales
Radio frequency identification devices — Handheld radio frequency RF scanners

Technology used in this occupation:

Data base user interface and query software — Data entry software
Electronic mail software — Email software; Microsoft Outlook
Inventory management software — Inventory tracking software
Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel
Word processing software — Microsoft Word

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Knowledge

Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

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Skills

Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

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Abilities

Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.

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Work Activities

Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization — Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
Interacting With Computers — Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Processing Information — Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
Selling or Influencing Others — Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.

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Work Context

Face-to-Face Discussions — 74% responded “Every day.”
Time Pressure — 60% responded “Every day.”
Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 57% responded “Extremely important.”
Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 53% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
Telephone — 75% responded “Every day.”
Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — 72% responded “Every day.”
Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 46% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
Frequency of Decision Making — 52% responded “Every day.”
Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — 46% responded “Every day.”
Structured versus Unstructured Work — 48% responded “A lot of freedom.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, physical therapist aides, salespersons (retail), and tellers.
SVP Range (4.0 to < 6.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
Not available Less than high school diploma
Not available High school diploma or equivalent Help
Not available Associate's degree

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Credentials

Find Certifications

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Interests

Interest code: CR

Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

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Work Styles

Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Social Orientation — Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

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Work Values

Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

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Related Occupations

39-3093.00 Locker Room, Coatroom, and Dressing Room Attendants
41-9041.00 Telemarketers
43-5051.00 Postal Service Clerks
43-5053.00 Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators
43-5071.00 Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks Bright Outlook   Green Occupation Green
43-5081.02 Marking Clerks   Bright Outlook Bright Outlook  
43-5081.03 Stock Clerks- Stockroom, Warehouse, or Storage Yard Bright Outlook
43-5111.00 Weighers, Measurers, Checkers, and Samplers, Recordkeeping
43-9051.00 Mail Clerks and Mail Machine Operators, Except Postal Service
51-6041.00 Shoe and Leather Workers and Repairers

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages data collected from Stock Clerks and Order Fillers.
Employment data collected from Stock Clerks and Order Fillers.
Industry data collected from Stock Clerks and Order Fillers.

Median wages (2013) $10.81 hourly, $22,480 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2012) 1,807,000 employees
Projected growth (2012-2022) Little or no change (-2% to 2%) Little or no change (-2% to 2%)
Projected job openings (2012-2022) 546,000
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2012)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2013 wage data external site and 2012-2022 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2012-2022). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

Find Jobs Job Banks

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

  • Material Recording Clerks external site. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition.

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