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Green Occupation:
19-2021.00 - Atmospheric and Space Scientists

Green occupations will likely change as a result of the green economy. Green economy activities and technologies are increasing the demand for occupations, shaping the work and worker requirements needed for occupational performance, or generating new and emerging occupations.

This is a Green Enhanced Skills occupation — green economy activities and technologies are likely to cause significant change to the work and worker requirements. New tasks, skills, knowledge, credentials may be needed. Employment demand remains the same, but there is potential for an increase.

Atmospheric and space scientists work in the following green economy sectors:

  • Environment Protection — This sector covers activities related to environmental remediation, climate change adaptation, and ensuring or enhancing air quality.
  • Research, Design, and Consulting Services — This sector encompasses "indirect jobs" to the green economy which includes activities such as energy consulting or research and other related business services.

They perform these tasks important to the green economy:

  • Analyze climate data sets, using techniques such as geophysical fluid dynamics, data assimilation, or numerical modeling.
  • Analyze historical climate information, such as precipitation or temperature records, to help predict future weather or climate trends.
  • Apply meteorological knowledge to issues such as global warming, pollution control, or ozone depletion.
  • Conduct meteorological research into the processes or determinants of atmospheric phenomena, weather, or climate.
  • Conduct numerical simulations of climate conditions to understand and predict global or regional weather patterns.
  • Conduct wind assessment, integration, or validation studies.
  • Consult with other offices, agencies, professionals, or researchers regarding the use and interpretation of climatological information for weather predictions and warnings.
  • Create visualizations to illustrate historical or future changes in the Earth's climate, using paleoclimate or climate geographic information systems (GIS) databases.
  • Estimate or predict the effects of global warming over time for specific geographic regions.
  • Formulate predictions by interpreting environmental data, such as meteorological, atmospheric, oceanic, paleoclimate, climate, or related information.
  • Interpret data, reports, maps, photographs, or charts to predict long- or short-range weather conditions, using computer models and knowledge of climate theory, physics, and mathematics.
  • Research the impact of industrial projects or pollution on climate, air quality, or weather phenomena.