Skip navigation

Summary Report for:
49-3022.00 - Automotive Glass Installers and Repairers

Replace or repair broken windshields and window glass in motor vehicles.

Sample of reported job titles: Automotive Glass Installer (Auto Glass Installer), Automotive Glass Technician (Auto Glass Technician), Automotive Glazier (Auto Glazier), Glass Installer, Glass Installer Technician, Glass Technician, Glass Technician/Installer, Master Automotive Glass Technician (Master Auto Glass Technician), Windshield Installer, Windshield Repair Technician

View report: Summary  Details  Custom

Tasks  |  Tools & Technology  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Prime all scratches on pinchwelds with primer and allow to dry.
  • Remove all dirt, foreign matter, and loose glass from damaged areas, apply primer along windshield or window edges, and allow primer to dry.
  • Allow all glass parts installed with urethane ample time to cure, taking temperature and humidity into account.
  • Apply a bead of urethane around the perimeter of each pinchweld and dress the remaining urethane on the pinchwelds so that it is of uniform level and thickness.
  • Select appropriate tools, safety equipment, and parts, according to job requirements.
  • Install replacement glass in vehicles.
  • Obtain windshields or windows for specific automobile makes and models from stock and examine them for defects prior to installation.
  • Check for and remove moisture or contamination in damaged areas and keep areas dry until repairs are complete.
  • Replace all moldings, clips, windshield wipers, or other parts that were removed prior to glass replacement or repair.
  • Remove broken or damaged glass windshields or window glass from motor vehicles, using hand tools to remove screws from frames holding glass.

back to top

Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

Mill saw file — Single-cut mill saw files
Pullers — Pliers action clip removers; Upholstery removal tools
Razor knives — Cold knives; Cut-out knives; Long knives; Urethane sealant cutout knives
Screwdrivers — Phillips head screwdrivers; Ratcheting screwdrivers
Shears — Oscillating power knives; Windshield removal power knives
Trim or molding tools — Lacing tools; Trim tools; Windshield molding removal tools
Ultraviolet UV lamps — Ultraviolet UV curing lamps; Ultraviolet UV lights

Technology used in this occupation:

Accounting software
Data base user interface and query software — Recordkeeping software
Project management software — Estimating software

back to top

Knowledge

Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Mechanical — Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Administration and Management — Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

back to top

Skills

Installation — Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Selection — Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

back to top

Abilities

Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
Multilimb Coordination — The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
Static Strength — The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.
Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
Control Precision — The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
Extent Flexibility — The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).

back to top

Work Activities

Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public — Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge — Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment — Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
Thinking Creatively — Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

back to top

Work Context

Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — 98% responded “Every day.”
Face-to-Face Discussions — 95% responded “Every day.”
Telephone — 89% responded “Every day.”
Outdoors, Exposed to Weather — 84% responded “Every day.”
In an Enclosed Vehicle or Equipment — 84% responded “Every day.”
Contact With Others — 29% responded “Contact with others most of the time.”
Time Pressure — 79% responded “Every day.”
Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 13% responded “Fairly important.”
Indoors, Not Environmentally Controlled — 33% responded “Once a week or more but not every day.”
Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 26% responded “More than half the time.”

back to top

Job Zone

Title Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, physical therapist aides, salespersons (retail), and tellers.
SVP Range (4.0 to < 6.0)

back to top

Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
90   High school diploma or equivalent Help
  Less than high school diploma
  Post-secondary certificate Help

back to top

Credentials

Find Training Find Certifications Find Licenses Find Apprenticeships

back to top

Interests

Interest code: RCE

Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising — Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

back to top

Work Styles

Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Leadership — Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.

back to top

Work Values

Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.

back to top

Related Occupations

47-2011.00 Boilermakers   Green Occupation Green
47-2211.00 Sheet Metal Workers Green Occupation
47-4071.00 Septic Tank Servicers and Sewer Pipe Cleaners Bright Outlook
47-4091.00 Segmental Pavers Bright Outlook
47-5013.00 Service Unit Operators, Oil, Gas, and Mining Green Occupation
49-3053.00 Outdoor Power Equipment and Other Small Engine Mechanics
49-9011.00 Mechanical Door Repairers Bright Outlook
49-9052.00 Telecommunications Line Installers and Repairers
49-9094.00 Locksmiths and Safe Repairers
53-7062.00 Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand   Bright Outlook Bright Outlook   Green Occupation

back to top

Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2013) $15.54 hourly, $32,310 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2012) 18,000 employees
Projected growth (2012-2022) Average (8% to 14%) Average (8% to 14%)
Projected job openings (2012-2022) 6,900
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2012)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2013 wage data external site and 2012-2022 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2012-2022). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

back to top

Job Openings on the Web

Find Jobs Job Banks

back to top

Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

back to top