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Summary Report for:
51-9123.00 - Painting, Coating, and Decorating Workers

Paint, coat, or decorate articles such as furniture, glass, plateware, pottery, jewelry, toys, books, or leather.

Sample of reported job titles: Artist, Decaler, Decorator, Glass Decorator, Glazer, In Mold Coater, Painter, Pottery Decorator, Silk-Screen Operator, Spray Painter

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Tasks  |  Technology Skills  |  Tools Used  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Detailed Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Apply coatings, such as paint, ink, or lacquer, to protect or decorate workpiece surfaces, using spray guns, pens, or brushes.
  • Examine finished surfaces of workpieces to verify conformance to specifications and retouch any defective areas.
  • Clean and maintain tools and equipment, using solvents, brushes, and rags.
  • Read job orders and inspect workpieces to determine work procedures and materials required.
  • Clean surfaces of workpieces in preparation for coating, using cleaning fluids, solvents, brushes, scrapers, steam, sandpaper, or cloth.
  • Rinse, drain, or wipe coated workpieces to remove excess coating material or to facilitate setting of finish coats on workpieces.
  • Place coated workpieces in ovens or dryers for specified times to dry or harden finishes.
  • Select and mix ingredients to prepare coating substances according to specifications, using paddles or mechanical mixers.
  • Melt or heat coating materials to specified temperatures.
  • Conceal blemishes in workpieces, such as nicks and dents, using fillers such as putty.

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Technology Skills

  • Data base user interface and query software — Data entry software Hot technology
  • Graphics or photo imaging software — Adobe Systems Adobe FreeHand; Adobe Systems Adobe Illustrator Hot technology ; Adobe Systems Adobe Photoshop Hot technology
  • Office suite software — Corel WordPerfect Office Suite

Hot technology Hot Technology — a technology requirement frequently included in employer job postings.

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Tools Used

  • Air dryers — Belt dryers
  • Blowers or dryers — Finishing ovens; Workpiece dryers
  • Calipers — Dial calipers
  • Cleaning brushes — Scrub brushes
  • Cleaning scrapers
  • Drying cabinets or ovens — Flash cure units
  • Enameling Kilns — Enamel setting kilns
  • Etching needles — Underglaze applicators
  • Hand sprayers — Spot cleaning guns
  • Heat guns — Hot air guns
  • Hydrometers — Digital hydrometers
  • Inkjet printers — Computer inkjet printers
  • Laser printers — Computer laser printers
  • Micrometers — Digital micrometers
  • Paint brushes — Glaze brushes; Soft bristled brushes; Specialty paint brushes
  • Paint mixers — Glaze mixers; Mechanical mixers; Mixing paddles
  • Paint rollers — Mini foam rollers
  • Paint sprayers — Paint spray guns
  • Palette knives — Palette knife sets
  • Personal computers
  • Potters wheels for hand made ceramics — Banding wheels; Decorating wheels
  • Power sanders — Cordless power sanders
  • Pressure or steam cleaners — Pressure washers
  • Remote reading thermometers — Temperature meters
  • Rulers — Precision rulers
  • Sifters — Enameling sifters; Metal sieves; Plastic sieves
  • Silk screen arc lamps — Exposure units
  • Silk screen printing machines — Four-color screen printing machines; Screen printing press; Spot process screen printing machines
  • Silk screen screens — Silkscreen screens
  • Silk screen squeegees — Silkscreen squeegees
  • Silkscreen accessories — Ink scoops; Scoop coaters
  • Stained glass tools or accessories — Painting bridges
  • T squares — Layout T-squares
  • Ultraviolet UV lamps — Ultraviolet UV curing units
  • Vacuum cleaners — Vacuum brushes

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Knowledge

  • Production and Processing — Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
  • Design — Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.

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Skills

No skills met the minimum score.

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Abilities

  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Visual Color Discrimination — The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness.
  • Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.

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Work Activities

  • Controlling Machines and Processes — Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Training and Teaching Others — Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Thinking Creatively — Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.

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Detailed Work Activities

  • Apply protective or decorative finishes to workpieces or products.
  • Inspect finishes of workpieces or finished products.
  • Operate painting or coating equipment.
  • Load items into ovens or furnaces.
  • Clean production equipment.
  • Maintain production or processing equipment.
  • Review blueprints or other instructions to determine operational methods or sequences.
  • Clean workpieces or finished products.
  • Mix ingredients to create specific finishes.
  • Select production input materials.
  • Heat material or workpieces to prepare for or complete production.
  • Melt metal, plastic, or other materials to prepare for production.
  • Fill cracks, imperfections, or holes in products or workpieces.
  • Immerse objects or workpieces in cleaning or coating solutions.
  • Cut fabrics.
  • Attach decorative or functional accessories to products.
  • Position patterns on equipment, materials, or workpieces.

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Work Context

  • Exposed to Contaminants — 83% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 71% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Spend Time Standing — 72% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 76% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Time Pressure — 70% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 48% responded “Very important.”
  • Contact With Others — 56% responded “Constant contact with others.”
  • Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — 69% responded “Every day.”
  • Indoors, Not Environmentally Controlled — 74% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Bending or Twisting the Body — 43% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — 68% responded “Every day.”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 60% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Repeating Same Tasks — 34% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Physical Proximity — 52% responded “Moderately close (at arm's length).”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 34% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Duration of Typical Work Week — 68% responded “40 hours.”
  • Pace Determined by Speed of Equipment — 48% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Spend Time Walking and Running — 34% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Coordinate or Lead Others — 30% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Frequency of Decision Making — 38% responded “Every day.”
  • Exposed to Hazardous Conditions — 52% responded “Every day.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 31% responded “Moderate results.”
  • Very Hot or Cold Temperatures — 34% responded “Every day.”
  • Responsibility for Outcomes and Results — 29% responded “Very high responsibility.”
  • Responsible for Others' Health and Safety — 27% responded “Very high responsibility.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions — 37% responded “Limited freedom.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include orderlies, forest firefighters, customer service representatives, security guards, upholsterers, and tellers.
SVP Range (4.0 to < 6.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
Not available Less than high school diploma
Not available High school diploma or equivalent Help
Not available Post-secondary certificate Help

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Credentials

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Interests

Interest code: R

  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

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Work Styles

  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Innovation — Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.

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Work Values

  • Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
  • Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
  • Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2015) $14.07 hourly, $29,270 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2014) 18,000 employees
Projected growth (2014-2024) Decline (-2% or lower) Decline (-2% or lower)
Projected job openings (2014-2024) 3,300
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2014)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2015 wage data external site and 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

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