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Details Report for:
29-1125.01 - Art Therapists

Plan or conduct art therapy sessions or programs to improve clients' physical, cognitive, or emotional well-being.

Sample of reported job titles: Art Psychotherapist, Art Therapist, Art Therapist/Licensed Professional Counselor (Art Therapist/LPC), Bereavement Program Coordinator, Children's Program Coordinator, Counselor/Art Therapist, Day Treatment Clinician/Art Therapist, Director of Community Life, Group Therapist, Registered & Board Certified Art Therapist

This title represents an occupation for which data collection is currently underway.

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Tasks  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Values  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks   Save Table (XLS/CSV)

  • Analyze data to determine the effectiveness of treatments or therapy approaches.
  • Analyze or synthesize client data to draw conclusions or make recommendations for art therapy.
  • Assess client needs or disorders, using drawing, painting, sculpting, or other artistic processes.
  • Communicate client assessment findings and recommendations in oral, written, audio, video, or other forms.
  • Conduct art therapy sessions providing guided self-expression experiences to help clients recover from or cope with cognitive, emotional, or physical impairments.
  • Confer with other professionals on client's treatment team to develop, coordinate, or integrate treatment plans.
  • Customize art therapy programs for specific client populations, such as those in schools, nursing homes, wellness centers, prisons, shelters, or hospitals.
  • Design art therapy sessions or programs to meet client's goals or objectives.
  • Develop individualized treatment plans that incorporate studio art therapy, counseling, or psychotherapy techniques.
  • Establish goals or objectives for art therapy sessions in consultation with clients or site administrators.
  • Instruct individuals or groups in the use of art media, such as paint, clay, or yarn.
  • Interpret the artistic creations of clients to assess their functioning, needs, or progress.
  • Observe and document client reactions, progress, or other outcomes related to art therapy.
  • Photograph or videotape client artwork for inclusion in client records or for promotional purposes.
  • Talk with clients during art or other therapy sessions to build rapport, acknowledge their progress, or reflect upon their reactions to the artistic process.
  • Write treatment plans, case summaries, or progress or other reports related to individual clients or client groups.
  • Conduct information sharing sessions, such as in-service workshops for other professionals, potential client groups, or the general community.
  • Coordinate art showcases to display artwork produced by clients.
  • Coordinate field trips for client groups to museums or other public displays of art.
  • Gather client information from sources such as case documentation, client observation, or interviews of client or family members.
  • Recommend or purchase needed art supplies or equipment.
  • Review research or literature in art therapy, psychology, or related disciplines.
  • Select or prepare artistic media or related equipment or devices to accomplish therapy session objectives.
  • Supervise staff, volunteers, practicum students, or interns.
  • Teach art therapy techniques or processes to artists, interns, volunteers, or others.

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Credentials

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Interests   Save Table (XLS/CSV)


Occupational Interest
Interest
100   Social — Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
95   Artistic — Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
50   Investigative — Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
28   Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
11   Enterprising — Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

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Work Values   Save Table (XLS/CSV)


Extent
Work Value
100   Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
78   Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
72   Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
58   Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
56   Recognition — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
45   Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages data collected from Recreational Therapists.
Employment data collected from Recreational Therapists.
Industry data collected from Recreational Therapists.

Median wages (2013) $20.76 hourly, $43,180 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2012) 20,000 employees
Projected growth (2012-2022) Average (8% to 14%) Average (8% to 14%)
Projected job openings (2012-2022) 6,700
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2012)
Health Care and Social Assistance (77% employed in this sector)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2013 wage data external site and 2012-2022 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2012-2022). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

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