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Summary Report for:
49-3092.00 - Recreational Vehicle Service Technicians

Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair, or overhaul recreational vehicles including travel trailers. May specialize in maintaining gas, electrical, hydraulic, plumbing, or chassis/towing systems as well as repairing generators, appliances, and interior components. Includes workers who perform customized van conversions.

Sample of reported job titles: Master Certified RV Technician (Master Certified Recreational Vehicle Technician), Recreational Vehicle Technician, Recreational Vehicle Parts and Service Director, Recreational Vehicle Service Technician, RVDA Master Certified RV Technician (Recreational Vehicle Dealer Association Master Certified Recreational Vehicle Technician), Mobile Service Recreational Vehicle Technician

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Tasks  |  Tools & Technology  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings

Tasks

  • Examine or test operation of parts or systems to ensure completeness of repairs.
  • Repair plumbing or propane gas lines, using caulking compounds and plastic or copper pipe.
  • Inspect recreational vehicles to diagnose problems and perform necessary adjustment, repair, or overhaul.
  • Locate and repair frayed wiring, broken connections, or incorrect wiring, using ohmmeters, soldering irons, tape, or hand tools.
  • Confer with customers, read work orders, or examine vehicles needing repair to determine the nature and extent of damage.
  • List parts needed, estimate costs, and plan work procedures, using parts lists, technical manuals, or diagrams.
  • Connect electrical systems to outside power sources and activate switches to test the operation of appliances or light fixtures.
  • Connect water hoses to inlet pipes of plumbing systems and test operation of toilets or sinks.
  • Remove damaged exterior panels and repair and replace structural frame members.
  • Open and close doors, windows, or drawers to test their operation, trimming edges to fit, as necessary.

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Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

Ammeters — Digital ammeters; Inductive ammeters; Milliamp meters
Circuit tester — Continuity testers; Electrical circuit testers; Polarity testers; Trailer plug testers
Power screwguns — Cordless screwdrivers; Electric screw guns
Screwdriver accessories and supplies — Flat screwdriver tips; Phillips screwdriver tips; Robertson screwdriver tips; Torx screwdriver tips
Specialty wrenches — Faucet wrenches; Pex wrenches; Thermostat wrenches

Technology used in this occupation:

Data base user interface and query software — RV Damage Repair Estimator; Topline Software Solutions Topline Service Manager
Electronic mail software — Email software
Inventory management software — Inventory tracking software
Point of sale POS software — Summit Ordering Systems RvInvoiceWriter
Word processing software — Microsoft Word

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Knowledge

Mechanical — Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

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Skills

Repairing — Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Equipment Maintenance — Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Operation Monitoring — Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Equipment Selection — Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Operation and Control — Controlling operations of equipment or systems.

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Abilities

Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Control Precision — The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
Extent Flexibility — The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.

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Work Activities

Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge — Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment — Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment — Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment — Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.

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Work Context

Face-to-Face Discussions — 91% responded “Every day.”
In an Enclosed Vehicle or Equipment — 78% responded “Every day.”
Cramped Work Space, Awkward Positions — 73% responded “Every day.”
Indoors, Not Environmentally Controlled — 74% responded “Every day.”
Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 70% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
Frequency of Decision Making — 74% responded “Every day.”
Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — 57% responded “Every day.”
Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — 48% responded “Every day.”
Time Pressure — 52% responded “Every day.”
Duration of Typical Work Week — 70% responded “More than 40 hours.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, physical therapist aides, salespersons (retail), and tellers.
SVP Range (4.0 to < 6.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
52   High school diploma or equivalent Help
39   Post-secondary certificate Help
  Less than high school diploma

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Credentials

Find Licenses Find Apprenticeships

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Interests

Interest code: RIC

Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative — Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

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Work Styles

Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

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Work Values

Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

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Related Occupations

47-2011.00 Boilermakers Green Occupation
49-3031.00 Bus and Truck Mechanics and Diesel Engine Specialists   Green Occupation Green
49-3041.00 Farm Equipment Mechanics and Service Technicians
49-3042.00 Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics, Except Engines
49-3051.00 Motorboat Mechanics and Service Technicians
49-9011.00 Mechanical Door Repairers   Bright Outlook Bright Outlook  
49-9012.00 Control and Valve Installers and Repairers, Except Mechanical Door
49-9052.00 Telecommunications Line Installers and Repairers
49-9098.00 Helpers--Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Workers Green Occupation
53-7071.00 Gas Compressor and Gas Pumping Station Operators

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2013) $16.89 hourly, $35,140 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2012) 11,000 employees
Projected growth (2012-2022) Average (8% to 14%) Average (8% to 14%)
Projected job openings (2012-2022) 4,800
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2012)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2013 wage data external site and 2012-2022 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2012-2022). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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