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Summary Report for:
35-1012.00 - First-Line Supervisors of Food Preparation and Serving Workers

Directly supervise and coordinate activities of workers engaged in preparing and serving food.

Sample of reported job titles: Food Service Supervisor, Kitchen Manager, Assistant Manager, Cafeteria Manager, Food Service Manager, Executive Chef, Restaurant Manager, Dietary Manager, Dietary Supervisor, Food Service Director

View report: Summary  Details  Custom

Tasks  |  Tools & Technology  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Train workers in food preparation, and in service, sanitation, and safety procedures.
  • Compile and balance cash receipts at the end of the day or shift.
  • Perform various financial activities such as cash handling, deposit preparation, and payroll.
  • Supervise and participate in kitchen and dining area cleaning activities.
  • Estimate ingredients and supplies required to prepare a recipe.
  • Resolve customer complaints regarding food service.
  • Control inventories of food, equipment, smallware, and liquor, and report shortages to designated personnel.
  • Purchase or requisition supplies and equipment needed to ensure quality and timely delivery of services.
  • Observe and evaluate workers and work procedures to ensure quality standards and service, and complete disciplinary write-ups.
  • Specify food portions and courses, production and time sequences, and workstation and equipment arrangements.

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Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

Bar code reader equipment — Barcode scanners; Linear imaging scanners; Long range charged coupled device CCD barcode scanners; Point of service scanners
Notebook computers
Paging controllers — Restaurant guest and server paging systems
Point of sale payment terminal — Card readers
Point of sale POS terminal — Point of sale POS terminals; Point of service workstations

Technology used in this occupation:

Accounting software — Compeat Restaurant Accounting Systems; CostGuard foodservice software
Data base user interface and query software — CaterPro Software; CBORD FoodService Suite
Human resources software — SoftCafe ScheduleWriter; Staff scheduling software
Inventory management software — AJV Food & Beverage software; CBORD Group Menu Management System; Regnow Chrysanth Inventory Manager
Point of sale POS software — Compris Advanced Manager's Workstation; ICVERIFY software; Intuit QuickBooks Point of Sale; NCR NeighborhoodPOS

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Knowledge

Administration and Management — Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Food Production — Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
Personnel and Human Resources — Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.

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Skills

Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.
Management of Personnel Resources — Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.
Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
Instructing — Teaching others how to do something.
Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

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Abilities

Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

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Work Activities

Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People — Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates — Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.
Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Training and Teaching Others — Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.
Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others — Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.
Coaching and Developing Others — Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public — Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards — Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.

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Work Context

Contact With Others — How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it?
Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?
Work With Work Group or Team — How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job?
Spend Time Standing — How much does this job require standing?
Coordinate or Lead Others — How important is it to coordinate or lead others in accomplishing work activities in this job?
Telephone — How often do you have telephone conversations in this job?
Physical Proximity — To what extent does this job require the worker to perform job tasks in close physical proximity to other people?
Duration of Typical Work Week — Number of hours typically worked in one week.
Deal With External Customers — How important is it to work with external customers or the public in this job?
Responsibility for Outcomes and Results — How responsible is the worker for work outcomes and results of other workers?

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, physical therapist aides, salespersons (retail), and tellers.
SVP Range (4.0 to < 6.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
51   High school diploma or equivalent
32   Less than high school diploma
  Doctoral or professional degree

This occupation may require a background in the following science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educational disciplines:

Life Sciences — Foods, Nutrition, and Related Services

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Interests

Interest code: ECR

Enterprising — Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

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Work Styles

Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Leadership — Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

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Work Values

Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.

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Related Occupations

11-9051.00 Food Service Managers
29-2051.00 Dietetic Technicians
35-1011.00 Chefs and Head Cooks
35-2012.00 Cooks, Institution and Cafeteria   Bright Outlook Bright Outlook  
35-2014.00 Cooks, Restaurant Bright Outlook
35-3011.00 Bartenders Bright Outlook
35-3021.00 Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food Bright Outlook
51-3011.00 Bakers
51-3021.00 Butchers and Meat Cutters
53-1021.00 First-Line Supervisors of Helpers, Laborers, and Material Movers, Hand

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Wages & Employment Trends

National

Median wages (2012) $14.07 hourly, $29,270 annual
Employment (2012) 849,000 employees
Projected growth (2012-2022) Average (8% to 14%) Average (8% to 14%)
Projected job openings (2012-2022) 348,700
Top industries (2012)

State & National

          CareerOneStop

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2012 wage data external site and 2012-2022 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2012-2022). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

Find Jobs
for First-Line Supervisors of Food Preparation and Serving Workers

          mySkills myFuture

State & National Job Banks

          CareerOneStop

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

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