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Summary Report for:
53-3031.00 - Driver/Sales Workers

Drive truck or other vehicle over established routes or within an established territory and sell or deliver goods, such as food products, including restaurant take-out items, or pick up or deliver items such as commercial laundry. May also take orders, collect payment, or stock merchandise at point of delivery. Includes newspaper delivery drivers.

Sample of reported job titles: Delivery Driver, Delivery Man, Driver, Driver Sales, Driver Salesman, Pizza Delivery Driver, Route Driver, Route Sales Driver, Route Salesman, Sales Route Driver

View report: Summary  Details  Custom

Tasks  |  Tools & Technology  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Collect money from customers, make change, and record transactions on customer receipts.
  • Drive trucks to deliver such items as food, medical supplies, or newspapers.
  • Write customer orders and sales contracts according to company guidelines.
  • Inform regular customers of new products or services and price changes.
  • Listen to and resolve customers' complaints regarding products or services.
  • Record sales or delivery information on daily sales or delivery record.
  • Call on prospective customers to explain company services or to solicit new business.
  • Arrange merchandise and sales promotion displays or issue sales promotion materials to customers.
  • Maintain trucks and food-dispensing equipment and clean inside of machines that dispense food or beverages.
  • Review lists of dealers, customers, or station drops and load trucks.

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Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

Bar code reader equipment — Barcode scanners
Delivery trucks — Delivery vans; Propane delivery trucks
Laser fax machine — Laser facsimile machines
Pallet trucks — Pallet movers
Portable data input terminals — Handheld computers

Technology used in this occupation:

Data base user interface and query software — MobiTech Systems Route Sales Trakker; Regulussoft Route Accounting; Soft Essentials Vending Essentials
Inventory management software — Computer Directions Route Sales Tracker
Map creation software — GEOCOMtms A.Maze Planning; Route planning software
Office suite software — Microsoft Office software
Project management software — bMobile Technology Route Manager; bMobile Technology Sales

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Knowledge

Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Transportation — Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

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Skills

Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.
Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
Persuasion — Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.
Mathematics — Using mathematics to solve problems.
Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Time Management — Managing one's own time and the time of others.

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Abilities

Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Far Vision — The ability to see details at a distance.
Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
Control Precision — The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
Depth Perception — The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.
Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).

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Work Activities

Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment — Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public — Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization — Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
Selling or Influencing Others — Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.
Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Interacting With Computers — Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Developing and Building Teams — Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.

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Work Context

Outdoors, Exposed to Weather — 91% responded “Every day.”
Contact With Others — 76% responded “Constant contact with others.”
In an Enclosed Vehicle or Equipment — 86% responded “Every day.”
Face-to-Face Discussions — 76% responded “Every day.”
Telephone — 74% responded “Every day.”
Time Pressure — 72% responded “Every day.”
Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 52% responded “Very important results.”
Very Hot or Cold Temperatures — 71% responded “Every day.”
Frequency of Decision Making — 25% responded “Once a week or more but not every day.”
Physical Proximity — 62% responded “Moderately close (at arm's length).”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, physical therapist aides, salespersons (retail), and tellers.
SVP Range (4.0 to < 6.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
Not available High school diploma or equivalent Help
Not available Less than high school diploma
Not available Some college, no degree

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Credentials

Find Certifications Find Licenses

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Interests

Interest code: RE

Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Enterprising — Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

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Work Styles

Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

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Work Values

Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

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Related Occupations

35-3021.00 Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food Bright Outlook
39-2021.00 Nonfarm Animal Caretakers
41-2011.00 Cashiers Bright Outlook
41-2021.00 Counter and Rental Clerks   Bright Outlook Bright Outlook  
43-5021.00 Couriers and Messengers
43-5071.00 Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks Bright Outlook   Green Occupation Green
43-5081.01 Stock Clerks, Sales Floor Bright Outlook
53-3041.00 Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs
53-6021.00 Parking Lot Attendants
53-6031.00 Automotive and Watercraft Service Attendants

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2013) $10.92 hourly, $22,720 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2012) 432,000 employees
Projected growth (2012-2022) Average (8% to 14%) Average (8% to 14%)
Projected job openings (2012-2022) 105,900
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2012)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2013 wage data external site and 2012-2022 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2012-2022). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

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