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Summary Report for:
29-1199.01 - Acupuncturists

Provide treatment of symptoms and disorders using needles and small electrical currents. May provide massage treatment. May also provide preventive treatments.

Sample of reported job titles: Acupuncture Physician, Acupuncturist, Licensed Acupuncturist

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Tasks  |  Technology Skills  |  Tools Used  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Detailed Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings

Tasks

  • Insert needles to provide acupuncture treatment.
  • Maintain and follow standard quality, safety, environmental and infection control policies and procedures.
  • Adhere to local, state and federal laws, regulations and statutes.
  • Identify correct anatomical and proportional point locations based on patients' anatomy and positions, contraindications, and precautions related to treatments such as intradermal needles, moxibution, electricity, guasha, or bleeding.
  • Maintain detailed and complete records of health care plans and prognoses.
  • Analyze physical findings and medical histories to make diagnoses according to Oriental medicine traditions.
  • Treat patients using tools such as needles, cups, ear balls, seeds, pellets, or nutritional supplements.
  • Develop individual treatment plans and strategies.
  • Evaluate treatment outcomes and recommend new or altered treatments as necessary to further promote, restore, or maintain health.
  • Collect medical histories and general health and life style information from patients.
  • Dispense herbal formulas and inform patients of dosages and frequencies, treatment duration, possible side effects and drug interactions.
  • Assess patients' general physical appearance to make diagnoses.
  • Educate patients on topics such as meditation, ergonomics, stretching, exercise, nutrition, the healing process, breathing, or relaxation techniques.
  • Formulate herbal preparations to treat conditions considering herbal properties such as taste, toxicity, effects of preparation, contraindications, and incompatibilities.
  • Consider Western medical procedures in health assessment, health care team communication, and care referrals.
  • Apply heat or cold therapy to patients using materials such as heat pads, hydrocollator packs, warm compresses, cold compresses, heat lamps, or vapor coolants.
  • Apply moxibustion directly or indirectly to patients using Chinese, non-scarring, stick, or pole moxa.
  • Treat medical conditions using techniques such as acupressure, shiatsu, or tuina.

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Technology Skills

  • Medical software — AcuBase Pro; Electronic health record EHR software; Qpalm Acupuncture; QPuncture II (see all 7 examples)
  • Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel Hot technology

Hot technology Hot Technology — a technology requirement frequently included in employer job postings.

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Tools Used

  • Acupuncture magnet pellet or seed — Therapeutic acupuncture magnets
  • Acupuncture needle — Ear tacks
  • Balance beams or boards or bolsters or rockers for rehabilitation or therapy — Positioning bolsters
  • Bandage scissors or its supplies — Bandage scissors; Scissor pincettes
  • Commercial use food grinders — Herb grinders
  • Electric vibrators for rehabilitation or therapy — Ultrasound massagers; Vibration massagers
  • Electronic blood pressure units — Blood pressure monitors
  • Floor grade forceps or hemostats — Angle tip forceps; Hemostat clamps; Lockable forceps; Splinter forceps
  • Foot care products — Foot rollers
  • Handheld thermometer — Handheld digital thermometers
  • Hypodermic needle — Filiform acupuncture needles; Intradermal acupuncture needles; Press needles; Seven-star needles (see all 5 examples)
  • Ion analyzers — Air ion testers
  • Ion exchange apparatus — Ionizers
  • Lancets — Lancet needles; Three-edged bloodletting needles
  • Lasers — Crystal probes; Laser pens
  • Mats or platforms for rehabilitation or therapy — Massage chairs; Massage tables
  • Medical acoustic stethoscope or accessory — Dual head stethoscopes
  • Medical diagnostic pinwheels — Wartenberg pinwheels
  • Medical heat lamps or accessories — Digital heat lamps; Infrared heat lamps; Mineral wave lamps; Portable heat lamps
  • Medical hydrocollators or accessories — Hydrocollator units
  • Medical tuning forks — Acutonics tuning forks
  • Mercury blood pressure units — Adenoid sphygmomanometers
  • Needle guides — Acupuncture needle guide tubes; Needle inserters; Needle plungers
  • Needle or blade or sharps disposal container or cart — Biohazard containers
  • Neurological diagnostic sets — Acupuncture ear probes
  • Neuromuscular stimulators or kits — Digital electronic acupunctoscopes; Electroacupuncture stimulation units; Microcurrent systems; Pulsed magnetic field generators (see all 7 examples)
  • Ophthalmoscopes or otoscopes or scope sets — Otoscopes
  • Reflex hammers or mallets — Babinski hammers; Buck neurological hammers; Taylor-type percussion hammers
  • Steam autoclaves or sterilizers — Autoclave sterilizers
  • Surgical clamps or clips or forceps or accessories — Adson forceps; Dressing forceps
  • Surgical scissors — Operating scissors
  • Therapeutic balls or accessories — Gua sha tools; Manaka hammers; Rolling drums
  • Therapeutic heating or cooling pads or compresses or packs — Glass cupping sets; Magnetic cupping sets; Therapeutic cooling packs; Therapeutic heating packs (see all 7 examples)
  • Therapeutic heating or cooling units or systems — Moxa boxes; Moxa burners; Moxa cans; Tiger warmers (see all 5 examples)
  • Tongue depressors or blades or sticks — Tongue depressors
  • Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation units — Trancutaneous electrical nerve stimulation TENS units
  • Tweezers — Tack tweezers; Wide grip tweezers
  • Vacuum pumps — Ion pumps
  • Wrist exercisers for rehabilitation or therapy — Hand exercise balls; Hand rollers; Magnetic finger rings

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Knowledge

  • Medicine and Dentistry — Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Psychology — Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
  • Therapy and Counseling — Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Biology — Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

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Skills

  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

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Abilities

  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Flexibility of Closure — The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material.
  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Category Flexibility — The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Visualization — The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.

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Work Activities

  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public — Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
  • Documenting/Recording Information — Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings — Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Thinking Creatively — Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization — Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
  • Developing Objectives and Strategies — Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them.
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge — Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others — Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
  • Processing Information — Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People — Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Analyzing Data or Information — Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Provide Consultation and Advice to Others — Providing guidance and expert advice to management or other groups on technical, systems-, or process-related topics.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

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Detailed Work Activities

  • Treat patients using alternative medical procedures.
  • Follow protocols or regulations for healthcare activities.
  • Record patient medical histories.
  • Analyze test data or images to inform diagnosis or treatment.
  • Develop treatment plans that use non-medical therapies.
  • Collect medical information from patients, family members, or other medical professionals.
  • Evaluate patient outcomes to determine effectiveness of treatments.
  • Prescribe treatments or therapies.
  • Advise patients on effects of health conditions or treatments.
  • Examine patients to assess general physical condition.
  • Train patients, family members, or caregivers in techniques for managing disabilities or illnesses.
  • Prepare medications or medical solutions.
  • Evaluate treatment options to guide medical decisions.
  • Treat patients using physical therapy techniques.

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Work Context

  • Contact With Others — 87% responded “Constant contact with others.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions — 88% responded “A lot of freedom.”
  • Physical Proximity — 82% responded “Very close (near touching).”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work — 70% responded “A lot of freedom.”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 79% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 58% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Exposed to Disease or Infections — 71% responded “Every day.”
  • Telephone — 54% responded “Every day.”
  • Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — 84% responded “Every day.”
  • Electronic Mail — 58% responded “Every day.”
  • Deal With External Customers — 39% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Frequency of Decision Making — 50% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 47% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 33% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 30% responded “Important results.”
  • Letters and Memos — 56% responded “Once a week or more but not every day.”
  • Spend Time Standing — 46% responded “More than half the time.”
  • Coordinate or Lead Others — 25% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Responsible for Others' Health and Safety — 37% responded “Moderate responsibility.”
  • Time Pressure — 26% responded “Every day.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Five: Extensive Preparation Needed
Education Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).
Related Experience Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.
Job Training Employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.
Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve coordinating, training, supervising, or managing the activities of others to accomplish goals. Very advanced communication and organizational skills are required. Examples include librarians, lawyers, astronomers, biologists, clergy, surgeons, and veterinarians.
SVP Range (8.0 and above)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
48   Master's degree
14   Professional degree Help
13   Doctoral degree

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Credentials

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Interests

Interest code: SRI

  • Social — Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative — Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

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Work Styles

  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Social Orientation — Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
  • Leadership — Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Innovation — Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.

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Work Values

  • Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
  • Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
  • Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages data collected from Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners, All Other.
Employment data collected from Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners, All Other.
Industry data collected from Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners, All Other.

Median wages (2016) $35.83 hourly, $74,530 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2014) 50,000 employees
Projected growth (2014-2024) Faster than average (9% to 13%) Faster than average (9% to 13%)
Projected job openings (2014-2024) 17,700
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2014)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2016 wage data external site and 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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