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Summary Report for:
51-6021.00 - Pressers, Textile, Garment, and Related Materials

Press or shape articles by hand or machine.

Sample of reported job titles: Dry Cleaner Presser, Garment Presser, Pants Presser, Presser, Pressing Machine Operator, Shirt Presser, Silk Presser

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Tasks  |  Tools & Technology  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Detailed Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings

Tasks

  • Operate steam, hydraulic, or other pressing machines to remove wrinkles from garments and flatwork items, or to shape, form, or patch articles.
  • Lower irons, rams, or pressing heads of machines into position over material to be pressed.
  • Remove finished pieces from pressing machines and hang or stack them for cooling, or forward them for additional processing.
  • Hang, fold, package, and tag finished articles for delivery to customers.
  • Slide material back and forth over heated, metal, ball-shaped forms to smooth and press portions of garments that cannot be satisfactorily pressed with flat pressers or hand irons.
  • Select appropriate pressing machines, based on garment properties such as heat tolerance.
  • Push and pull irons over surfaces of articles to smooth or shape them.
  • Finish pleated garments, determining sizes of pleats from evidence of old pleats or from work orders, using machine presses or hand irons.
  • Straighten, smooth, or shape materials to prepare them for pressing.
  • Finish pants, jackets, shirts, skirts and other dry-cleaned and laundered articles, using hand irons.
  • Position materials such as cloth garments, felt, or straw on tables, dies, or feeding mechanisms of pressing machines, or on ironing boards or work tables.
  • Spray water over fabric to soften fibers when not using steam irons.
  • Moisten materials to soften and smooth them.
  • Finish velvet garments by steaming them on bucks of hot-head presses or steam tables, and brushing pile (nap) with handbrushes.
  • Finish fancy garments such as evening gowns and costumes, using hand irons to produce high quality finishes.
  • Activate and adjust machine controls to regulate temperature and pressure of rollers, ironing shoes, or plates, according to specifications.
  • Shrink, stretch, or block articles by hand to conform to original measurements, using forms, blocks, and steam.
  • Clean and maintain pressing machines, using cleaning solutions and lubricants.
  • Block or shape knitted garments after cleaning.
  • Insert heated metal forms into ties and touch up rough places with hand irons.
  • Brush materials made of suede, leather, or felt to remove spots or to raise and smooth naps.
  • Use covering cloths to prevent equipment from damaging delicate fabrics.
  • Press ties on small pressing machines.
  • Select, install, and adjust machine components, including pressing forms, rollers, and guides, using hoists and hand tools.
  • Examine and measure finished articles to verify conformance to standards, using measuring devices such as tape measures and micrometers.
  • Sew ends of new material to leaders or to ends of material in pressing machines, using sewing machines.
  • Measure fabric to specifications, cut uneven edges with shears, fold material, and press it with an iron to form a heading.

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Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

  • Adjustable wrenches — Adjustable hand wrenches
  • Clothing hangers — Multipurpose hangers
  • Domestic clothing irons — Hand irons
  • Garment brushes — Fabric cleaning brushes
  • Hammers — Multipurpose hammers
  • Hand sprayers — Handheld sprayers
  • Hoists
  • Ironing boards — Heavy duty ironing boards
  • Ironing machines or presses — Flat pressers; Hot-head presses; Puff irons; Small pressing machines (see all 6 examples)
  • Laundry type combined washing or drying machines — Tunnel presses
  • Micrometers — Digital micrometers
  • Personal computers
  • Rulers — Measuring gauges
  • Screwdrivers — Multipurpose screwdrivers
  • Sewing machines — Industrial sewing machines
  • Shears — Electric fabric cutters; Fabric shears
  • Slip joint pliers
  • Steam pressing machines — Steam fabric pressing machines; Steam tables
  • Straight edges — Guides
  • Tape measures — Measuring tapes

Technology used in this occupation:

  • Electronic mail software — Email software
  • Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel Hot technology
  • Word processing software — Microsoft Word

Hot technology Hot Technology — a technology requirement frequently included in employer job postings.

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Knowledge

  • Public Safety and Security — Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Administration and Management — Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

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Skills

  • Operation and Control — Controlling operations of equipment or systems.

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Abilities

  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Control Precision — The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Multilimb Coordination — The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
  • Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Rate Control — The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
  • Reaction Time — The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
  • Trunk Strength — The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.

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Work Activities

  • Controlling Machines and Processes — Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.

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Detailed Work Activities

  • Smooth garments with irons, presses, or steamers.
  • Remove products or workpieces from production equipment.
  • Stack finished items for further processing or shipment.
  • Select production equipment according to product specifications.
  • Mark products, workpieces, or equipment with identifying information.
  • Package products for storage or shipment.
  • Adjust fabrics or other materials during garment production.
  • Set equipment guides, stops, spacers, or other fixtures.
  • Prepare fabrics or materials for processing or production.
  • Adjust temperature controls of ovens or other heating equipment.
  • Clean production equipment.
  • Maintain production or processing equipment.
  • Install mechanical components in production equipment.
  • Inspect garments for defects, damage, or stains.
  • Measure dimensions of completed products or workpieces to verify conformance to specifications.
  • Operate sewing equipment.
  • Cut fabrics.
  • Measure materials to mark reference points, cutting lines, or other indicators.

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Work Context

  • Spend Time Standing — 100% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 98% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Indoors, Not Environmentally Controlled — 75% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 68% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Time Pressure — 79% responded “Every day.”
  • Very Hot or Cold Temperatures — 60% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 40% responded “Very important.”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work — 44% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions — 46% responded “A lot of freedom.”
  • Physical Proximity — 32% responded “Moderately close (at arm's length).”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 33% responded “Very important.”
  • Spend Time Walking and Running — 47% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Pace Determined by Speed of Equipment — 44% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Spend Time Bending or Twisting the Body — 41% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Exposed to Minor Burns, Cuts, Bites, or Stings — 32% responded “Never.”
  • Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — 53% responded “Every day.”
  • Exposed to Contaminants
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 35% responded “Every day.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone One: Little or No Preparation Needed
Education Some of these occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate.
Related Experience Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.
Job Zone Examples These occupations involve following instructions and helping others. Examples include counter and rental clerks, dishwashers, cashiers, furniture finishers, logging equipment operators, and baristas.
SVP Range (Below 4.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
60   Less than high school diploma
39   High school diploma or equivalent Help

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Credentials

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Interests

Interest code: RC

  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

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Work Styles

  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Social Orientation — Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.

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Work Values

  • Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
  • Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
  • Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

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Related Occupations

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2015) $9.84 hourly, $20,470 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2014) 52,000 employees
Projected growth (2014-2024) Decline (-2% or lower) Decline (-2% or lower)
Projected job openings (2014-2024) 12,100
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2014)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2015 wage data external site and 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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