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Summary Report for:
35-2011.00 - Cooks, Fast Food

Prepare and cook food in a fast food restaurant with a limited menu. Duties of these cooks are limited to preparation of a few basic items and normally involve operating large-volume single-purpose cooking equipment.

Sample of reported job titles: Cook, Crew Member, Crew Person, Crew Trainer, Fry Cook, Grill Cook, Line Cook, Pizza Cook, Pizza Maker, Prep Cook

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Tasks  |  Technology Skills  |  Tools Used  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Detailed Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Maintain sanitation, health, and safety standards in work areas.
  • Clean food preparation areas, cooking surfaces, and utensils.
  • Verify that prepared food meets requirements for quality and quantity.
  • Cook and package batches of food, such as hamburgers or fried chicken, which are prepared to order or kept warm until sold.
  • Prepare specialty foods, such as pizzas, fish and chips, sandwiches, or tacos, following specific methods that usually require short preparation time.
  • Operate large-volume cooking equipment, such as grills, deep-fat fryers, or griddles.
  • Read food order slips or receive verbal instructions as to food required by patron, and prepare and cook food according to instructions.
  • Measure ingredients required for specific food items being prepared.
  • Take food and drink orders and receive payment from customers.
  • Clean, stock, and restock workstations and display cases.
  • Cook the exact number of items ordered by each customer, working on several different orders simultaneously.
  • Wash, cut, and prepare foods designated for cooking.
  • Serve orders to customers at windows, counters, or tables.
  • Prepare and serve beverages, such as coffee or fountain drinks.
  • Pre-cook items, such as bacon, to prepare them for later use.
  • Mix ingredients, such as pancake or waffle batters.
  • Schedule activities and equipment use with managers, using information about daily menus to help coordinate cooking times.
  • Prepare dough, following recipe.
  • Order and take delivery of supplies.

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Technology Skills

  • Point of sale POS software — Aldelo Systems Aldelo for Restaurants Pro; Foodman Home-Delivery; Plexis Software Plexis POS; RestaurantPlus PRO

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Tools Used

  • Cappuccino or espresso machines — Cappuccino makers
  • Carbonated beverage dispenser — Carbonated beverage dispensers
  • Cash registers
  • Commercial use blenders — Restaurant blenders
  • Commercial use coffee or iced tea makers — Commercial coffeemakers
  • Commercial use convection ovens — Convection ovens
  • Commercial use cutlery — Chefs' knives
  • Commercial use deep fryers — Deep fat fryers
  • Commercial use food processors — Restaurant food processors
  • Commercial use food slicers — Slicing machines
  • Commercial use griddles — Griddles
  • Commercial use grills — Grills
  • Commercial use heat lamps — Food warmers
  • Commercial use hot dog grills — Hot dog cookers
  • Commercial use mixers — Mixers
  • Commercial use pizza ovens — Pizza ovens
  • Commercial use ranges — Electric ovens; Gas ovens
  • Commercial use scales — Food scales
  • Domestic wooden oven paddle — Bakers' peels
  • Ice dispensers — Ice-making machines
  • Intercom systems
  • Milkshake machines — Milkshake and smoothie machines
  • Non carbonated beverage dispenser — Juice dispensers
  • Point of sale POS terminal — Point of sale POS computer terminals
  • Soft serve machines — Soft-serve ice cream machines
  • Touch screen monitors

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Knowledge

  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Food Production — Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.

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Skills

  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Abilities

  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Trunk Strength — The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Selective Attention — The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.

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Work Activities

  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public — Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
  • Training and Teaching Others — Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others — Handling complaints, settling disputes, and resolving grievances and conflicts, or otherwise negotiating with others.
  • Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards — Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
  • Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings — Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization — Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
  • Coordinating the Work and Activities of Others — Getting members of a group to work together to accomplish tasks.
  • Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People — Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Processing Information — Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Developing and Building Teams — Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members.
  • Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Coaching and Developing Others — Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills.
  • Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
  • Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information — Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.

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Detailed Work Activities

  • Clean food preparation areas, facilities, or equipment.
  • Check quality of foods or supplies.
  • Cook foods.
  • Measure ingredients.
  • Process customer bills or payments.
  • Take customer orders.
  • Stock serving stations or dining areas with food or supplies.
  • Prepare foods for cooking or serving.
  • Serve food or beverages.
  • Prepare hot or cold beverages.
  • Mix ingredients.
  • Coordinate timing of food production activities.
  • Prepare breads or doughs.
  • Order materials, supplies, or equipment.

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Work Context

  • Spend Time Standing — 88% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Contact With Others — 91% responded “Constant contact with others.”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 59% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — 84% responded “Every day.”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 73% responded “Every day.”
  • Physical Proximity — 55% responded “Moderately close (at arm's length).”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 43% responded “More than half the time.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 38% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 54% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Exposed to Minor Burns, Cuts, Bites, or Stings — 45% responded “Every day.”
  • Time Pressure — 53% responded “Every day.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions — 36% responded “A lot of freedom.”
  • Deal With External Customers — 33% responded “Very important.”
  • Spend Time Walking and Running — 38% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work — 37% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Telephone — 57% responded “Every day.”
  • Deal With Unpleasant or Angry People — 28% responded “Every day.”
  • Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — 56% responded “Every day.”
  • Coordinate or Lead Others — 38% responded “Important.”
  • Importance of Repeating Same Tasks — 35% responded “Important.”
  • Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — 37% responded “Never.”
  • Frequency of Decision Making — 34% responded “Never.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 43% responded “Important results.”
  • Responsibility for Outcomes and Results — 27% responded “Moderate responsibility.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone One: Little or No Preparation Needed
Education Some of these occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate.
Related Experience Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.
Job Zone Examples These occupations involve following instructions and helping others. Examples include counter and rental clerks, dishwashers, cashiers, furniture finishers, logging equipment operators, and baristas.
SVP Range (Below 4.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
87   Less than high school diploma
10   High school diploma or equivalent Help
2   Some college, no degree

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Credentials

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Interests

Interest code: RC

  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

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Work Styles

  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Social Orientation — Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Leadership — Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.

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Work Values

  • Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
  • Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
  • Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2015) $9.17 hourly, $19,080 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2014) 524,000 employees
Projected growth (2014-2024) Decline (-2% or lower) Decline (-2% or lower)
Projected job openings (2014-2024) 138,700
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2014)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2015 wage data external site and 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

  • Cooks external site. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition.

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