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Summary Report for:
51-9071.01 - Jewelers

Fabricate and repair jewelry articles. Make models or molds to create jewelry items.

Sample of reported job titles: Bench Jeweler, Earrings Fabricator, Gemologist, Goldsmith, Jeweler

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Tasks  |  Tools & Technology  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Detailed Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings  |  Additional Information

Tasks

  • Smooth soldered joints and rough spots, using hand files and emery paper, and polish smoothed areas with polishing wheels or buffing wire.
  • Position stones and metal pieces, and set, mount, and secure items in place, using setting and hand tools.
  • Create jewelry from materials such as gold, silver, platinum, and precious or semiprecious stones.
  • Make repairs, such as enlarging or reducing ring sizes, soldering pieces of jewelry together, and replacing broken clasps and mountings.
  • Clean and polish metal items and jewelry pieces, using jewelers' tools, polishing wheels, and chemical baths.
  • Select and acquire metals and gems for designs.
  • Compute costs of labor and materials in order to determine production costs of products and articles.
  • Mark and drill holes in jewelry mountings in order to center stones according to design specifications.
  • Examine assembled or finished products to ensure conformance to specifications, using magnifying glasses or precision measuring instruments.
  • Construct preliminary models of wax, metal, clay, or plaster, and form sample castings in molds.
  • Pour molten metal alloys or other materials into molds in order to cast models of jewelry.
  • Cut, shape, and smooth gemstones, pearls, and metal pieces, using abrasives, grinding stones, and power and hand tools.
  • Soften metal to be used in designs by heating it with a gas torch and shape it, using hammers and dies.
  • Determine appraised values of diamonds and other gemstones based on price guides, market fluctuations, and stone grades and rarity.
  • Alter existing jewelry mountings in order to reposition jewels or to adjust mountings.
  • Grade stones based on their color, perfection, and quality of cut.
  • Plate articles such as jewelry pieces and watch dials, using silver, gold, nickel, or other metals.
  • Write or modify design specifications such as the metal contents and weights of items.
  • Create new jewelry designs and modify existing designs, using computers as necessary.
  • Examine gemstone surfaces and internal structures to evaluate genuineness, quality, and value, using polariscopes, refractometers, and other optical instruments.
  • Buy and sell jewelry, or serve as agents between buyers and sellers.
  • Record the weights and processing times of finished pieces.
  • Lay out designs on metal stock, and cut along markings to fabricate pieces used to cast metal molds.
  • Fabricate, modify, or repair jigs, fixtures, and hand tools such as scrapers, cutters, gougers, and shapers.
  • Mark, engrave, or emboss designs on metal pieces such as castings, wire, or jewelry, following specifications.
  • Cut designs in molds or other materials to be used as models in the fabrication of metal and jewelry products.
  • Design and fabricate molds, models, and machine accessories, and modify hand tools used to cast metal and jewelry pieces.
  • Research and analyze reference materials, and consult with interested parties in order to develop new products or modify existing designs.
  • Weigh, mix, and melt metal alloys or materials needed for jewelry models.
  • Remove mold castings from metal or jewelry workpieces, and place workpieces in water or on trays to cool.
  • Place metal samples in frames, pack raw rubber around samples, and clamp samples, frames, and rubber into vulcanizing machines.
  • Assemble and secure mold sections used to cast metal articles and pieces.

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Tools & Technology

Tools used in this occupation:

  • Abrasive stones — Grinding stones
  • Air compressors
  • Anodizing machine — Pen platers
  • Applicator brushes — Flux brushes
  • Awls — Awl sets
  • Ball peen hammer — Ball peen hammers
  • Battery testers
  • Bead accessories — Beading tools
  • Belt sander — Belt sanders
  • Bench refractometers or polarimeters — Bench refractometers
  • Bench scales — Digital scales
  • Bench vises — Mini bench vises
  • Binocular light compound microscopes — Gemological microscopes
  • Blow torch — Blow torches; Casting torches
  • Burnisher — Burnishing tools
  • Calipers — Digital calipers
  • Crimping pliers — Pocket crimpers
  • Cross and straight pein hammer — Chasing hammers
  • Curved nose pliers — Bent chain nose pliers
  • Dapping punches — Chasing tools; Dapping tools
  • Diagonal cut pliers — Diagonal cutters; Flush cutters
  • Dial indicator or dial gauge — Dial gauges
  • Drill press or radial drill — Drill presses
  • End cut pliers — Oblique end cutters; Side cutters
  • Engravers — Engraving tools; Pneumatic gravers
  • Engraving machines — Engraving blocks
  • Flat nose pliers
  • Fume hoods or cupboards — Fume hoods
  • Hammers — Embossing hammers; Fretz hammers; Texture hammers
  • Hand reamer — Bead reamers
  • Jewel appraising tester — Diamond testers; Gem gauges
  • Jeweler scissors — Jewelry scissors
  • Jewellers pliers — Jewelers' chain-nose pliers; Split ring pliers; Tweezer nose pliers; Wire looping pliers (see all 20 examples)
  • Jewelry mandrels
  • Knurling tool — Milgrain machines; Milgrain tools
  • Laboratory hotplates — Electric hot plates
  • Laser welding machine — Laser welders
  • Light boxes
  • Loupes — Jeweler's loupes
  • Magnifiers — Handheld magnifiers
  • Mallets
  • Mechanical or ultrasonic metal cleaner — Ultrasonic cleaners
  • Metal cutters — Micro bevel cutters; Ring cutters
  • Mini pliers — Micro pliers
  • Paint brushes — Sable brushes
  • Polariscopes
  • Power buffers — Polishing wheels
  • Power drills — Cordless power drills
  • Precision file — Hand files
  • Precision screwdriver — Precision screwdriver sets
  • Pressure or steam cleaners — Steam cleaners
  • Punching pliers — Hole punch pliers
  • Respirators
  • Ring sizers — Ring rollers; Ring sizing sets; Ring stretcher/reducers
  • Round nose pliers
  • Rulers — Precision rulers
  • Safety glasses — Eye protection
  • Scratch brushes
  • Shears — Mini shears
  • Soldering iron — Soldering guns
  • Stamping die — Metal stamping dies
  • Thickness measuring devices — Digital gauges
  • Tongs — Draw tongs
  • Tumblers or polishers — Bench top polishers; Magnetic tumblers; Polishing units
  • Tweezers — Mini tweezers; Plastic coated tweezers; Soldering tweezers; Utility tweezers (see all 8 examples)
  • Utility knives — Bench knives
  • Vacuum pumps
  • Watch or clock repair kits — Case presses; Watch hand removers
  • Wire brushes — Bristle brushes
  • Wire cutters — Wire cutting tools
  • Wire mills — Jump ring makers; Rolling mills

Technology used in this occupation:

  • Accounting software — Intuit QuickBooks Hot technology
  • Computer aided design CAD software Hot technology — Computer assisted jewelry design CAD software
  • Customer relationship management CRM software — Customer information databases
  • Data base user interface and query software — Retail management software
  • Internet browser software — Web browser software
  • Inventory management software — Inventory tracking software
  • Point of sale POS software — Jewelry store point of sale POS software

Hot technology Hot Technology — a technology requirement frequently included in employer job postings.

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Knowledge

  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Design — Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Production and Processing — Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

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Skills

  • Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Operations Analysis — Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Time Management — Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

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Abilities

  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Control Precision — The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Category Flexibility — The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
  • Originality — The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem.
  • Visual Color Discrimination — The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Visualization — The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Flexibility of Closure — The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material.
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Fluency of Ideas — The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).
  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Mathematical Reasoning — The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Selective Attention — The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.

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Work Activities

  • Thinking Creatively — Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics of Products, Events, or Information — Estimating sizes, distances, and quantities; or determining time, costs, resources, or materials needed to perform a work activity.
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge — Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public — Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
  • Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People — Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Scheduling Work and Activities — Scheduling events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others.
  • Selling or Influencing Others — Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
  • Controlling Machines and Processes — Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Monitoring and Controlling Resources — Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Communicating with Persons Outside Organization — Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings — Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment — Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.

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Detailed Work Activities

  • Polish materials, workpieces, or finished products.
  • Smooth metal surfaces or edges.
  • Align parts or workpieces to ensure proper assembly.
  • Design jewelry or decorative objects.
  • Repair precision devices or workpieces.
  • Solder parts or workpieces.
  • Clean workpieces or finished products.
  • Order materials, supplies, or equipment.
  • Select production input materials.
  • Estimate costs of products, services, or materials.
  • Draw guide lines or markings on materials or workpieces using patterns or other references.
  • Drill holes in parts, equipment, or materials.
  • Measure dimensions of completed products or workpieces to verify conformance to specifications.
  • Build production molds.
  • Melt metal, plastic, or other materials to prepare for production.
  • Measure ingredients or substances to be used in production processes.
  • Mix ingredients to create specific finishes.
  • Place materials into molds.
  • Cut industrial materials in preparation for fabrication or processing.
  • Shape metal workpieces with hammers or other small hand tools.
  • Remove workpieces from molds.
  • Heat material or workpieces to prepare for or complete production.
  • Evaluate quality of materials or products.
  • Apply protective or decorative finishes to workpieces or products.
  • Examine physical characteristics of gemstones or precious metals.
  • Record operational or production data.
  • Assemble machine tools, parts, or fixtures.
  • Repair production equipment or tools.
  • Mount materials or workpieces onto production equipment.
  • Engrave designs, text, or other markings onto materials, workpieces, or products.
  • Confer with customers or designers to determine order specifications.
  • Adjust position of molds during processing.
  • Shape clay or dough to create products.

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Work Context

  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 83% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — 92% responded “Every day.”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 75% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 67% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Telephone — 63% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Sitting — 61% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Time Pressure — 58% responded “Every day.”
  • Exposed to Contaminants — 54% responded “Every day.”
  • Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — 52% responded “Every day.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions — 39% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Frequency of Decision Making — 43% responded “Every day.”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work — 54% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Contact With Others — 33% responded “Contact with others most of the time.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 35% responded “Very important results.”
  • Duration of Typical Work Week — 71% responded “40 hours.”
  • Exposed to Minor Burns, Cuts, Bites, or Stings — 39% responded “Every day.”
  • Deal With External Customers — 33% responded “Important.”
  • Exposed to Hazardous Conditions — 50% responded “Every day.”
  • Level of Competition — 38% responded “Highly competitive.”
  • Electronic Mail — 38% responded “Once a week or more but not every day.”
  • Physical Proximity — 54% responded “Moderately close (at arm's length).”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 43% responded “More than half the time.”
  • Importance of Repeating Same Tasks — 29% responded “Very important.”
  • Exposed to Hazardous Equipment — 42% responded “Every day.”
  • Responsible for Others' Health and Safety — 33% responded “High responsibility.”
  • Consequence of Error — 30% responded “Not serious at all.”
  • Letters and Memos — 25% responded “Once a month or more but not every week.”
  • Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — 33% responded “Every day.”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 33% responded “Very important.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Three: Medium Preparation Needed
Education Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
Related Experience Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.
Job Training Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations usually involve using communication and organizational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include food service managers, travel guides, electricians, agricultural technicians, barbers, nannies, and medical assistants.
SVP Range (6.0 to < 7.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
33   High school diploma or equivalent Help
33   Post-secondary certificate Help
17   Less than high school diploma

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Credentials

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Interests

Interest code: RA

  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Artistic — Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

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Work Styles

  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Innovation — Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
  • Analytical Thinking — Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.

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Work Values

  • Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
  • Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
  • Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

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Related Occupations

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages data collected from Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers.
Employment data collected from Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers.
Industry data collected from Jewelers and Precious Stone and Metal Workers.

Median wages (2015) $17.82 hourly, $37,060 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2014) 40,000 employees
Projected growth (2014-2024) Decline (-2% or lower) Decline (-2% or lower)
Projected job openings (2014-2024) 6,200
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2014)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2015 wage data external site and 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

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