Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

Keep buildings in clean and orderly condition. Perform heavy cleaning duties, such as cleaning floors, shampooing rugs, washing walls and glass, and removing rubbish. Duties may include tending furnace and boiler, performing routine maintenance activities, notifying management of need for repairs, and cleaning snow or debris from sidewalk.

Sample of reported job titles: Building Custodian, Building Service Worker, Building Services Technician, Cleaner, Custodial Worker, Custodian, Floor Tech (Floor Technician), Heavy Duty Custodian, Institutional Custodian, Janitor

Occupation-Specific Information

Tasks

  • Service, clean, or supply restrooms.
  • Clean building floors by sweeping, mopping, scrubbing, or vacuuming.
  • Gather and empty trash.
  • Follow procedures for the use of chemical cleaners and power equipment to prevent damage to floors and fixtures.
  • Mix water and detergents or acids in containers to prepare cleaning solutions, according to specifications.
  • Clean windows, glass partitions, or mirrors, using soapy water or other cleaners, sponges, or squeegees.
  • Notify managers concerning the need for major repairs or additions to building operating systems.
  • Requisition supplies or equipment needed for cleaning and maintenance duties.
  • Dust furniture, walls, machines, or equipment.
  • Strip, seal, finish, and polish floors.
  • Clean and polish furniture and fixtures.
  • Steam-clean or shampoo carpets.
  • Move heavy furniture, equipment, or supplies, either manually or with hand trucks.
  • Remove snow from sidewalks, driveways, or parking areas, using snowplows, snow blowers, or snow shovels, or spread snow-melting chemicals.
  • Monitor building security and safety by performing tasks such as locking doors after operating hours or checking electrical appliance use to ensure that hazards are not created.
  • Clean laboratory equipment, such as glassware or metal instruments, using solvents, brushes, rags, or power cleaning equipment.
  • Mow or trim lawns or shrubbery, using mowers or hand or power trimmers, and clear debris from grounds.
  • Set up, arrange, or remove decorations, tables, chairs, ladders, or scaffolding to prepare facilities for events, such as banquets or meetings.
  • Make adjustments or minor repairs to heating, cooling, ventilating, plumbing, or electrical systems.
  • Clean and restore building interiors damaged by fire, smoke, or water, using commercial cleaning equipment.
  • Spray insecticides or fumigants to prevent insect or rodent infestation.
  • Drive vans, industrial trucks, or other vehicles required to travel to, or to perform, cleaning work.
  • Clean chimneys, flues, and connecting pipes, using power or hand tools.

back to top

Technology Skills

Hot technology Hot Technologies are requirements frequently included in employer job postings.

back to top

Occupational Requirements

Work Activities

  • Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling materials.
  • Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Materials — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

back to top

Detailed Work Activities

back to top

Work Context

  • Spend Time Standing — 82% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 62% responded “Every day.”
  • Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — 65% responded “Every day.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions — 56% responded “A lot of freedom.”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work — 49% responded “A lot of freedom.”
  • Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets — 66% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 57% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Spend Time Walking and Running — 43% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 44% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 41% responded “Very important.”
  • Exposed to Contaminants — 55% responded “Every day.”
  • Contact With Others — 39% responded “Contact with others most of the time.”
  • Responsible for Others' Health and Safety — 36% responded “High responsibility.”
  • Frequency of Decision Making — 57% responded “Every day.”
  • Time Pressure — 45% responded “Every day.”
  • Coordinate or Lead Others — 35% responded “Very important.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 39% responded “Very important results.”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 35% responded “About half the time.”
  • Spend Time Bending or Twisting the Body — 35% responded “About half the time.”
  • Responsibility for Outcomes and Results — 27% responded “Very high responsibility.”
  • Exposed to Hazardous Conditions — 47% responded “Every day.”
  • Telephone — 36% responded “Once a week or more but not every day.”

back to top

Experience Requirements

Job Zone

Title
Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education
These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience
Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training
Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples
These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include orderlies, counter and rental clerks, customer service representatives, security guards, upholsterers, and tellers.
SVP Range
3 months to 1 year of preparation (4.0 to < 6.0)

back to top

Training & Credentials

State training
Local training
Certifications
State licenses
Apprenticeships
Have a career path or location in mind? Visit Apprenticeship.gov external site to find apprenticeship opportunities near you.

back to top

Worker Requirements

Skills

  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

back to top

Knowledge

  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

back to top

Education

How much education does a new hire need to perform a job in this occupation? Respondents said:

  • 72%
     
    responded: High school diploma or equivalent requiredmore info
  • 19%
     
    responded: Less than high school diploma required
  • 7%
     
    responded: Bachelor’s degree required

back to top

Worker Characteristics

Abilities

  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Static Strength — The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.
  • Trunk Strength — The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without "giving out" or fatiguing.
  • Extent Flexibility — The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.

back to top

Interests

Interest code: RC
Want to discover your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler at My Next Move.
  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

back to top

Work Values

  • Relationships — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
  • Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
  • Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

back to top

Work Styles

  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Integrity — Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Self-Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high-stress situations.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Persistence — Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Social Orientation — Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.

back to top

Workforce Characteristics

Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2021)
$14.31 hourly, $29,760 annual
State wages
Local wages
Employment (2020)
2,217,000 employees
Projected growth (2020-2030)
Average (5% to 10%)
Projected job openings (2020-2030)
314,900
State trends
Top industries (2020)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2021 wage data external site and 2020-2030 employment projections external site . “Projected growth” represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2020-2030). “Projected job openings” represent openings due to growth and replacement.

back to top

Job Openings on the Web

State job openings
Local job openings

back to top

More Information

back to top

Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

back to top