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Summary Report for:
39-3021.00 - Motion Picture Projectionists

Set up and operate motion picture projection and related sound reproduction equipment.

Sample of reported job titles: Booth Manager, Booth Operator, Booth Supervisor, Booth Usher, Motion Picture Projectionist, Movie Projectionist, Projection Technician, Projectionist, Projector Booth Operator

View report: Summary  Details  Custom

Tasks  |  Technology Skills  |  Tools Used  |  Knowledge  |  Skills  |  Abilities  |  Work Activities  |  Detailed Work Activities  |  Work Context  |  Job Zone  |  Education  |  Credentials  |  Interests  |  Work Styles  |  Work Values  |  Related Occupations  |  Wages & Employment  |  Job Openings

Tasks

  • Insert film into top magazine reel, or thread film through a series of sprockets and guide rollers, attaching the end to a take-up reel.
  • Start projectors and open shutters to project images onto screens.
  • Monitor operations to ensure that standards for sound and image projection quality are met.
  • Operate equipment to show films in a number of theaters simultaneously.
  • Splice separate film reels, advertisements, and movie trailers together to form a feature-length presentation on one continuous reel.
  • Inspect movie films to ensure that they are complete and in good condition.
  • Set up and adjust picture projectors and screens to achieve proper size, illumination, and focus of images, and proper volume and tone of sound.
  • Inspect projection equipment prior to operation to ensure proper working order.
  • Perform regular maintenance tasks such as rotating or replacing xenon bulbs, cleaning lenses, lubricating machinery, and keeping electrical contacts clean and tight.
  • Remove film splicing to prepare films for shipment after showings and return films to their sources.
  • Splice and rewind film onto reels automatically, or by hand, to repair faulty or broken sections of film.
  • Perform minor repairs such as replacing worn sprockets, or notify maintenance personnel of the need for major repairs.
  • Open and close facilities according to rules and schedules.
  • Observe projector operation to anticipate need to transfer operations from one projector to another.
  • Set up and inspect curtain and screen controls.
  • Project motion pictures onto back screens for inclusion in scenes within film or stage productions.
  • Remove full take-up reels and run film through rewinding machines to rewind projected films so they may be shown again.
  • Operate special-effects equipment, such as stereopticons, to project pictures onto screens.
  • Coordinate equipment operation with presentation of supplemental material, such as music, oral commentaries, or sound effects.
  • Install and connect auxiliary equipment, such as microphones, amplifiers, disc playback machines, and lights.
  • Prepare film inspection reports, attendance sheets, and log books.

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Technology Skills

  • Internet browser software — Web browser software
  • Presentation software — Microsoft PowerPoint Hot technology
  • Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel Hot technology
  • Word processing software — Microsoft Word

Hot technology Hot Technology — a technology requirement frequently included in employer job postings.

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Tools Used

  • Allen wrench — Allen wrenches
  • Audio amplifier — Power amplifiers
  • Cleaning brushes — Screen cleaning brushes
  • Emergency light unit — Emergency lighting
  • Film projectors — 16mm motion picture projectors; 8mm motion picture projectors; Portable motion picture projectors
  • Film splicers — Splicing machines
  • Film washers — Film cleaning machines
  • Follow spots — Spotlights
  • High capacity removable media drives — Portable hard drives
  • Laser disc players — Laser disc playback machines
  • Microphones — Cordless microphones
  • Nut drivers — Precision nut drivers
  • Personal computers
  • Projection screens or displays — Movie theatre screens
  • Screwdrivers — Flathead screwdrivers; Phillips screwdrivers
  • Slide projectors — Multi-image slide projectors; Opaque slide projectors; Still image projectors
  • Stage or projection or studio lighting system — Theater lights
  • Tape duplicator — Portable tape reproducers
  • Video projectors — Digital movie projectors
  • Video tape rewinders — Film rewinders

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Knowledge

  • Mechanical — Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

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Skills

  • Operation and Control — Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Operation Monitoring — Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

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Abilities

  • Far Vision — The ability to see details at a distance.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Control Precision — The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Manual Dexterity — The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
  • Arm-Hand Steadiness — The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
  • Hearing Sensitivity — The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
  • Reaction Time — The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  • Visual Color Discrimination — The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness.

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Work Activities

  • Controlling Machines and Processes — Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material — Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings — Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
  • Handling and Moving Objects — Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events — Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
  • Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment — Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
  • Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment — Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
  • Training and Teaching Others — Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.

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Detailed Work Activities

  • Operate audio-visual equipment.
  • Prepare film for distribution or use.
  • Monitor operational quality or safety.
  • Inspect equipment to ensure proper functioning.
  • Perform basic equipment maintenance.
  • Arrange facility schedules.
  • Prepare operational reports or records.

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Work Context

  • Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — 92% responded “Every day.”
  • Time Pressure — 73% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — 59% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Spend Time Using Your Hands to Handle, Control, or Feel Objects, Tools, or Controls — 59% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Face-to-Face Discussions — 47% responded “Every day.”
  • Telephone — 51% responded “Every day.”
  • Importance of Repeating Same Tasks — 43% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Contact With Others — 36% responded “Constant contact with others.”
  • Pace Determined by Speed of Equipment — 41% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Impact of Decisions on Co-workers or Company Results — 37% responded “Very important results.”
  • Spend Time Making Repetitive Motions — 34% responded “Continually or almost continually.”
  • Freedom to Make Decisions — 50% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Frequency of Decision Making — 48% responded “Every day.”
  • Spend Time Standing — 50% responded “About half the time.”
  • Structured versus Unstructured Work — 47% responded “Some freedom.”
  • Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable — 41% responded “Every day.”
  • Work With Work Group or Team — 32% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Spend Time Walking and Running — 30% responded “About half the time.”
  • Degree of Automation — 40% responded “Highly automated.”
  • Responsibility for Outcomes and Results — 27% responded “Moderate responsibility.”
  • Consequence of Error — 32% responded “Fairly serious.”
  • Deal With External Customers — 31% responded “Extremely important.”
  • Letters and Memos — 28% responded “Never.”

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Job Zone

Title Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include orderlies, forest firefighters, customer service representatives, security guards, upholsterers, and tellers.
SVP Range (4.0 to < 6.0)

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Education


Percentage of Respondents
Education Level Required
49   Less than high school diploma
47   High school diploma or equivalent Help
3   Bachelor's degree

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Credentials

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Interests

Interest code: RC

  • Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional — Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

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Work Styles

  • Dependability — Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Attention to Detail — Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Cooperation — Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
  • Independence — Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
  • Initiative — Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
  • Stress Tolerance — Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
  • Adaptability/Flexibility — Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
  • Self Control — Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
  • Achievement/Effort — Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
  • Concern for Others — Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
  • Leadership — Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.

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Work Values

  • Support — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
  • Independence — Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
  • Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

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Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2016) $10.62 hourly, $22,100 annual
State wages Local Salary Info
 
Employment (2014) 7,000 employees
Projected growth (2014-2024) Decline (-2% or lower) Decline (-2% or lower)
Projected job openings (2014-2024) 2,700
State trends Employment Trends
 
Top industries (2014)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2016 wage data external site and 2014-2024 employment projections external site. "Projected growth" represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2014-2024). "Projected job openings" represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

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