Special Education Teachers, Elementary School
25-2056.00

A subset of this occupation's profile is available. Data collection is currently underway to populate other parts of the profile.

Teach academic, social, and life skills to elementary school students with learning, emotional, or physical disabilities. Includes teachers who specialize and work with students who are blind or have visual impairments; students who are deaf or have hearing impairments; and students with intellectual disabilities.

Sample of reported job titles: Emotional Disabilities Teacher, Hearing Impaired Itinerant Teacher (HI Itinerant Teacher), Learning Support Teacher, Resource Program Teacher, Severe Emotional Disorders Elementary Teacher (SED Elementary Teacher), Special Education Inclusion Teacher, Special Education Resource Teacher, Special Education Teacher

Occupation-Specific Information

Tasks Save Table: XLSX CSV

  • Administer standardized ability and achievement tests to elementary students with special needs.
  • Attend professional meetings, educational conferences, or teacher training workshops to maintain or improve professional competence.
  • Collaborate with other teachers or administrators to develop, evaluate, or revise elementary school programs.
  • Confer with other staff members to plan or schedule lessons promoting learning, following approved curricula.
  • Confer with parents, administrators, testing specialists, social workers, or other professionals to develop individual educational plans (IEPs) for students' educational, physical, or social development.
  • Coordinate placement of students with special needs into mainstream classes.
  • Develop or implement strategies to meet the needs of students with a variety of disabilities.
  • Encourage students to explore learning opportunities or persevere with challenging tasks to prepare them for later grades.
  • Establish and communicate clear objectives for all lessons, units, and projects to students.
  • Establish and enforce rules for behavior and procedures for maintaining order among students.
  • Guide or counsel students with adjustment problems, academic problems, or special academic interests.
  • Instruct and monitor students in the use and care of equipment or materials to prevent injuries and damage.
  • Instruct special needs students in academic subjects, using a variety of techniques, such as phonetics, multisensory learning, or repetition to reinforce learning and meet students' varying needs.
  • Instruct students in daily living skills required for independent maintenance and self-sufficiency, such as hygiene, safety, or food preparation.
  • Interpret the results of standardized tests to determine students' strengths and areas of need.
  • Maintain accurate and complete student records as required by laws, district policies, or administrative regulations.
  • Meet with parents or guardians to discuss their children's progress, advise them on using community resources, or teach skills for dealing with students' impairments.
  • Modify the general elementary education curriculum for special-needs students.
  • Monitor teachers or teacher assistants to ensure adherence to special education program requirements.
  • Observe and evaluate students' performance, behavior, social development, and physical health.
  • Organize and display students' work in a manner appropriate for their perceptual skills.
  • Organize and supervise games or other recreational activities to promote physical, mental, or social development.
  • Plan or conduct activities for a balanced program of instruction, demonstration, and work time that provides students with opportunities to observe, question, and investigate.
  • Plan or supervise experiential learning activities, such as class projects, field trips, demonstrations, or visits by guest speakers.
  • Prepare classrooms with a variety of materials or resources for children to explore, manipulate, or use in learning activities or imaginative play.
  • Prepare objectives, outlines, or other materials for courses of study, following curriculum guidelines or school or state requirements.
  • Prepare, administer, or grade tests or assignments to evaluate students' progress.
  • Provide assistive devices, supportive technology, or assistance accessing facilities, such as restrooms.
  • Teach socially acceptable behavior, employing techniques such as behavior modification or positive reinforcement.
  • Teach students personal development skills, such as goal setting, independence, or self-advocacy.

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Technology Skills Save Table: XLSX CSV

  • Computer based training software — Children's educational software; EasyCBM; Rethink Ed; Scientific Learning Fast ForWord
  • Data base user interface and query software — American Sign Language Browser; Individualized Educational Program IEP software
  • Device drivers or system software — Screen magnification software; Screen reader software; Synapse outSPOKEN; The vOICe Learning Edition
  • Electronic mail software — Email software; Microsoft Outlook Hot technology
  • Graphics or photo imaging software — Drawing software
  • Internet browser software — Web browser software
  • Office suite software — Microsoft Office software Hot technology
  • Presentation software — Microsoft PowerPoint Hot technology
  • Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel Hot technology
  • Voice recognition software — goQ WordQ; Nuance Dragon NaturallySpeaking; Voice activated software
  • Word processing software — Microsoft Word Hot technology
Hot technology
Hot Technologies are requirements most frequently included across all employer job postings.

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Tools Used Save Table: XLSX CSV

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Occupational Requirements

Detailed Work Activities Save Table: XLSX CSV

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Experience Requirements

Job Zone Save Table: XLSX CSV

Title
Job Zone Four: Considerable Preparation Needed
Education
Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
Related Experience
A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.
Job Training
Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
Job Zone Examples
Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include real estate brokers, sales managers, database administrators, graphic designers, conservation scientists, art directors, and cost estimators.
SVP Range
(7.0 to < 8.0)

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Training & Credentials

State training
Local training
Certifications
State licenses

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Apprenticeship Opportunities

Start your career and build your skillset. Visit Apprenticeship.gov external site to learn about opportunities related to this occupation.

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Worker Characteristics

Interests Save Table: XLSX CSV

Occupational InterestInterest
100
 
Social — Work involves helping, teaching, advising, assisting, or providing service to others. Social occupations are often associated with social, health care, personal service, teaching/education, or religious activities.
49
 
Investigative — Work involves studying and researching non-living objects, living organisms, disease or other forms of impairment, or human behavior. Investigative occupations are often associated with physical, life, medical, or social sciences, and can be found in the fields of humanities, mathematics/statistics, information technology, or health care service.
44
 
Artistic — Work involves creating original visual artwork, performances, written works, food, or music for a variety of media, or applying artistic principles to the design of various objects and materials. Artistic occupations are often associated with visual arts, applied arts and design, performing arts, music, creative writing, media, or culinary art.
41
 
Conventional — Work involves following procedures and regulations to organize information or data, typically in a business setting. Conventional occupations are often associated with office work, accounting, mathematics/statistics, information technology, finance, or human resources.
22
 
Realistic — Work involves designing, building, or repairing of equipment, materials, or structures, engaging in physical activity, or working outdoors. Realistic occupations are often associated with engineering, mechanics and electronics, construction, woodworking, transportation, machine operation, agriculture, animal services, physical or manual labor, athletics, or protective services.
13
 
Enterprising — Work involves managing, negotiating, marketing, or selling, typically in a business setting, or leading or advising people in political and legal situations. Enterprising occupations are often associated with business initiatives, sales, marketing/advertising, finance, management/administration, professional advising, public speaking, politics, or law.

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Workforce Characteristics

Wages & Employment Trends

Median wage data for Special Education Teachers, Kindergarten and Elementary School.
Employment data for Special Education Teachers, Kindergarten and Elementary School.
Industry data for Special Education Teachers, Kindergarten and Elementary School.
Median wages (2022)
$62,390 annual
State wages
Local wages
Employment (2022)
194,700 employees
Projected growth (2022-2032)
Little or no change
Projected job openings (2022-2032)
12,900
State trends
Top industries (2022)
Educational Services (98% employed in this sector)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2022 wage data external site and 2022-2032 employment projections external site. “Projected growth” represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2022-2032). “Projected job openings” represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

State job openings
Local job openings

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More Information

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

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