Shuttle Drivers and Chauffeurs

A subset of this occupation's profile is available. Data collection is currently underway to populate other parts of the profile.

Drive a motor vehicle to transport passengers on a planned or scheduled basis. May collect a fare. Includes nonemergency medical transporters and hearse drivers.

Sample of reported job titles: Airport Shuttle Driver, Chauffeur, Driver, Limo Driver (Limousine Driver), Motor Coach Driver, Shuttle Bus Driver, Shuttle Driver, Special Needs Bus Driver, Van Driver

Occupation-Specific Information

Tasks Save Table: XLSX CSV

  • Arrange to pick up particular customers or groups on a regular schedule.
  • Check the condition of a vehicle's tires, brakes, windshield wipers, lights, oil, fuel, water, and safety equipment to ensure that everything is in working order.
  • Collect fares or vouchers from passengers, and make change or issue receipts as necessary.
  • Communicate with dispatchers by radio, telephone, or computer to exchange information and receive requests for passenger service.
  • Complete accident reports when necessary.
  • Comply with traffic regulations to operate vehicles in a safe and courteous manner.
  • Drive shuttle busses, limousines, company cars, or privately owned vehicles to transport passengers.
  • Follow relevant safety regulations and state laws governing vehicle operation, and ensure that passengers follow safety regulations.
  • Maintain knowledge of first-aid procedures.
  • Notify dispatchers or company mechanics of vehicle problems.
  • Operate vehicles with specialized equipment, such as wheelchair lifts, to transport and secure passengers with special needs.
  • Perform errands for customers or employers, such as delivering or picking up mail and packages.
  • Perform minor vehicle repairs, such as cleaning spark plugs, or take vehicles to mechanics for servicing.
  • Perform routine vehicle maintenance, such as regulating tire pressure and adding gasoline, oil, and water.
  • Pick up and drop off passengers at regularly scheduled neighborhood locations, following strict time schedules.
  • Pick up or meet passengers according to requests, appointments, or schedules.
  • Prepare and submit reports that may include the number of passengers or trips, hours worked, mileage driven fuel consumed, or fares received.
  • Provide passengers with assistance entering and exiting vehicles, and help them with any luggage.
  • Provide passengers with information or advice about the local area, points of interest, hotels, or restaurants.
  • Read maps and follow written and verbal geographic directions.
  • Record vehicle routes.
  • Regulate heating, lighting, and ventilation systems for passenger comfort.
  • Report any vehicle malfunctions or needed repairs.
  • Report delays, accidents, or other traffic and transportation situations, using telephones or mobile two-way radios.
  • Test vehicle equipment, such as lights, brakes, horns, or windshield wipers, to ensure proper operation.
  • Vacuum and clean interiors, and wash and polish exteriors of automobiles.

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Technology Skills Save Table: XLSX CSV

Hot technology
Hot Technologies are requirements most frequently included across all employer job postings.

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Tools Used Save Table: XLSX CSV

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Occupational Requirements

Detailed Work Activities Save Table: XLSX CSV

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Experience Requirements

Job Zone Save Table: XLSX CSV

Title
Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed
Education
These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
Related Experience
Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.
Job Training
Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
Job Zone Examples
These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include orderlies, counter and rental clerks, customer service representatives, security guards, upholsterers, tellers, and dental laboratory technicians.
SVP Range
(4.0 to < 6.0)

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Training & Credentials

State training
Local training
Certifications
State licenses

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Apprenticeship Opportunities

Start your career and build your skillset. Visit Apprenticeship.gov external site to learn about opportunities related to this occupation.

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Worker Characteristics

Interests Save Table: XLSX CSV

Occupational InterestInterest
91
 
Realistic — Work involves designing, building, or repairing of equipment, materials, or structures, engaging in physical activity, or working outdoors. Realistic occupations are often associated with engineering, mechanics and electronics, construction, woodworking, transportation, machine operation, agriculture, animal services, physical or manual labor, athletics, or protective services.
53
 
Conventional — Work involves following procedures and regulations to organize information or data, typically in a business setting. Conventional occupations are often associated with office work, accounting, mathematics/statistics, information technology, finance, or human resources.
35
 
Social — Work involves helping, teaching, advising, assisting, or providing service to others. Social occupations are often associated with social, health care, personal service, teaching/education, or religious activities.
20
 
Enterprising — Work involves managing, negotiating, marketing, or selling, typically in a business setting, or leading or advising people in political and legal situations. Enterprising occupations are often associated with business initiatives, sales, marketing/advertising, finance, management/administration, professional advising, public speaking, politics, or law.
0
 
Artistic — Work involves creating original visual artwork, performances, written works, food, or music for a variety of media, or applying artistic principles to the design of various objects and materials. Artistic occupations are often associated with visual arts, applied arts and design, performing arts, music, creative writing, media, or culinary art.
0
 
Investigative — Work involves studying and researching non-living objects, living organisms, disease or other forms of impairment, or human behavior. Investigative occupations are often associated with physical, life, medical, or social sciences, and can be found in the fields of humanities, mathematics/statistics, information technology, or health care service.

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Workforce Characteristics

Wages & Employment Trends

Median wages (2022)
$15.77 hourly, $32,800 annual
State wages
Local wages
Employment (2022)
218,400 employees
Projected growth (2022-2032)
Faster than average (5% to 8%)
Projected job openings (2022-2032)
32,600
State trends
Top industries (2022)
Transportation and Warehousing (42% employed in this sector)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2022 wage data external site and 2022-2032 employment projections external site. “Projected growth” represents the estimated change in total employment over the projections period (2022-2032). “Projected job openings” represent openings due to growth and replacement.

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Job Openings on the Web

State job openings
Local job openings

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More Information

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Sources of Additional Information

Disclaimer: Sources are listed to provide additional information on related jobs, specialties, and/or industries. Links to non-DOL Internet sites are provided for your convenience and do not constitute an endorsement.

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